Cinquedea

Cinquedea


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Cinquedea

The Cinquedea is a straight, very broad bladed knife of Italian origin. The name refers to the blade width, which was supposed to be 5 fingers wide at the hilt. It was normally carried horizontally so that it could be drawn with the left hand from the back or belt; it was designed to use brute force to penetrate gaps in armour plate, with the width of blade giving the weapon its strength.

Cinquedea - History

The Cinquedea by Lutel: Threat or Menace
A hands-on review by Gene George

Introduction
The cinquedea enjoyed a brief period of popularity in the 15th and 16th centuries. Ewart Oakeshott, in his book Archaeology of Weapons, states that "(b)efore about 1460 or 1470 it seems to have been unknown, and there are no specimens which can be said with certainty to have been made after about 1520". Only achieving popularity in Italy, and unlike other fashions of the Italian Renaissance, cinquedeas did not seem to spread to the rest of Europe.

Typically quite broad at the quillons, the "five fingers" wide blade gives the cinquedea its name. Cinquedeas ranged in size from small belt daggers to full-sized swords. De Rocca in Swords and Hilt Weapons points to the cinquedea as primarily a fashionable civilian weapon, rather than a piece of military hardware. Oakeshott speculates that the cinquedea style is directly derived from classical Bronze Age and early Iron Age Greek and Mycenaean weapons.

One of the appealing qualities of the cinquedea form is that the broad blade makes an excellent canvas for etching or engraving, and indeed many examples are literally covered with intricate artwork. Even the more plain examples usually bear attractive multiple fullers that could only be created on a blade of extreme width.

Although the cinquedea eventually lost the battle for novelty and was discarded, it remains a unique sidearm that was very much a product of its time. The question every student of historical weapons seems to ask about the cinquedea is "is it a sword or a dagger?" The cinquedea form has been documented with blade lengths from six to nine inches long to full-sized battle swords. There is even a photograph of a very large cinquedea-like two handed bearing sword shaped like a giant pie server. The average size documented by Oakeshott is stated to be 15" to 20" and 3 1/2" to 4" at the hilt.

Overview
Lutel produces a number of moderately priced historical replicas. Based in the city of Opava in the eastern Czech Republic, Lutel uses modern techniques to recreate historical arms and armor. Their designs show good attention to detail and excellent craftsmanship. My business dealings with them have always been prompt, professional and courteous. My orders were acknowledged quickly and progress was easy to monitor on their Web site.

This piece doesn't seem to duplicate any particular historical sword, but it exhibits all of the characteristics of the classic cinquedea: A wide, stiff blade with multiple fullers, downward pointing curved quillons, and the distinctive hilt style that Oakeshott claims is derived from classical sword and dagger hilts.

Measurements and Specifications:

Weight: 1 pounds 6 ounces
Overall length: 22 1/4 inches
Blade length: 17 inches
Blade Width: 3 inches
Grip and pommel length: 5 inches
Point of Balance: 4 inches from guard

Replica created by Lutel of the Czech Republic.

Handling Characteristics
For the purposes of handling, this Lutel piece seems to be right around average. My answer to the dagger vs. short sword question is that this particular cinquedea is a short sword pure and simple. The blade is very stiff and suited to thrusting even with a rounded point. The trowel-like point would produce terrific wounds on an unarmored opponent. The wide, rather flat blade can also be used for hacking cuts that few blades this size could match.

Moving the weapon around is relatively easy, as balance is quite good. This is a short sword with more presence and authority than most simply due to its slightly greater weight carried in a compact package. Much like some earlier Viking, migration, and "dark ages" period swords the rather angular hilt and pommel are difficult to grip using a "hammer" grip with the handle running straight across the palm. Placing the pommel at the heel of my hand seems much more natural and would make for a good strong thrust. This seems to be a feature on cinquedeas bearing similar pommel shapes and the same handling notes apply here.

The sword was shipped sharpened and displays good edge geometry with no secondary bevel. It has what I would consider a good working edge and there would be no real need to do more than keep it maintained. It isn't razor sharp as some production swords arrive, but has enough strength and sharpness to do any thrusting or cleaving required of it.

Fit and Finish
Lutel has done a good job in presenting a well-made piece. The blade shows good form and a radical distal taper from 1/8" at the hilt to approximately 1/32" at the broad spatulate tip. The blade has six fullers in three rows of 3, 2, and 1 and these are deeply and precisely cut. The blade and fullers are finished moderately well with some hand polishing required to remove fine scratches, especially in the hard to reach areas of the fullers. Overall the sword is tight and fittings precisely matched with little to no gaps. The wooden hilt is dyed black and is either oak or walnut (I think it is oak) with a pair of brass florets on each side that add an elegant and subtle design touch. The scabbard echoes the 3, 2, and 1 layout of the fullers and has a leather locket with pinking and knot work carving and is finished with a metal chape. Overall the effect is striking and this sword would be right at home slung at the right hip or across the small of the back of a young bravo out for a night of carousing in the dark and dangerous streets of Florence or along the canals of Venice.

Conclusion
Even though the cinquedea form was in fashion for only a few decades, it remains a popular piece with collectors of reproduction arms. Why is this? Perhaps it's because the cinquedea represents one of the first efforts of Renaissance artisans to blend ancient form and function in an intentional design aesthetic. That speaks to a lot of collectors, myself included.

The Renaissance was a time of rebirth of classical values, and more importantly, a time when these values were systematically applied to everyday objects to enhance them both in terms of appearance and function. The cinquedea form swords and daggers represent an interesting change in the approach to weapons and in the art and science of making, decorating and using them.

No longer were swords and daggers mere tools to be used, but they had become canvases to display the art and artifice of the Italian Renaissance. This is evidenced in not only the cinquedea but in almost all forms of weapons produced. Maybe the fact that the cinquedea had such a brief period of use before fashion passed it by makes it all the more valuable as an indicator of the mood and mindset of our forefathers.

About the Author
Gene George has been fascinated with weapons and armor as long as he can recall. A former archaeologist and historian, he lives with his wife 14 miles west of where they filmed The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) and 60 miles North-Northwest of where they filmed Captain Blood (1935). He has a big pile of swords and wants more.

Acknowledgements
Photographer: Gene George


Received my Cold Steel Cinquedea.

Here is an appropriate video for this thread


It truly looks like they had a lot of fun making this short video for Cold Steel thanks for video. now I know how to pronounce the name of it properly too.

Not2sharp

If the zombies do come around I would still go with this one:

Bill Siegle made this beast for me some 20 years ago.

Johnnywizzo

PocketKnifeJimmy

I hope the items you receive have zero issues and that you wind up extremely happy with them

PocketKnifeJimmy

It is actually a very simple thing to buy. It’s primary purpose is to serve as a decorator item. So if you feel it looks decorative go for it.

edited to add:
All of the components (with the exception of the decorative handle pins) are steel. There is no zinc/pot metal.

*The top knife is probably a 19th century reproduction. Note the old handle repair and the inlaid stones in the ricasso.

Are both of those yours?
That top reproduction is pretty nifty in it's own right
I would love to know what the writing on it translates to in English.

If I had engraving skills, I'd buy another Cold Steel Cinquedea and perform some elaborate engraving on it. I mean, it sure has a lot of blank canvas for an engraver to have at it!

Not2sharp

. That top reproduction is pretty nifty in it's own right
I would love to know what the writing on it translates to in English.

It is a reference to Lucretia Borgia, the Duchess of Ferrara (province in Northern Italy), and likely patterned after a medal struck in 1505. She was an (in)famous renaissance princess and the daughter of Pope Alexandre VI. In life she was described as beautiful (with long blond hair and blue eyes), charming and highly intelligent she spoke 6 languages, played the lute and was educated in the humanities. She was also highly competent and actually ran the administration of the Vatican (at 21), an office usually held by a Cardinal and later on would steer the Province of Ferrara Italy through difficult times.

Although, highly regarded by most who knew her in life, she is given a reputation in history as a femme fetal and is said to have frequently poisoned people. There is no historical evidence of this, and seems to have been of a tragic pawn for her father and brother, who are known to have been power hungry murderers. They had her second husband murdered at the Vatican in front of St. Peter‘s, and her brother in particular would prove a blood thirsty ruler ( and former Cardinal ) in his own kingdom.

She is a popular tragic villain in art and fiction, and is the subject of a famous opera named after her, that was first performed in 1833. She is usually portrayed as a Cersei-like , although she may have been more like a Margarie Tyrell. Both characters were likely partially based on her.


15th Century AD Swords

Anelace Sword - Anelace was a very short sword and by some it was considered a long dagger. The sword was contemporary to the Italian Cinquedea. Anelace featured a double-edged blade that was very wide at the base of the hilt and tapered towards the point of the blade. The sword could be used to defend against sword attacks and also be used as a dagger.

Bastard Sword - The bastard sword, or contemporary espée bastarde, is a type of long sword dating from roughly the early 15th century. It received its name for fitting into neither the one-handed sword family, nor the two handed sword family, thus being labelled a "bastard". These weapons featured longer grips similar to those found on the longswords. The bastard sword, more so than the great sword, plays into the "hand-and-a-half sword" classification, as some great swords provided considerably more than an extra "half" hand for gripping. Like the transition swords, the first bastard swords featured a plain or cruciform cross-guard (cross) and a round or wheel pommel. Later development of the weapon, however, saw the inclusion of curved quillions, ring guards, and compound hilts similar to those on baskethilts. These served to provide increased protection for the wielder's hands and may have also positively affected the balance of the weapon.

Cinquedea Sword - Cinquedea is a short thrusting sword that originated in Northern Italy and was in use during the Renaissance period. The name “Cinquedea” means “five fingers” and it relates to the width of the blade by the hilt. The sword featured a heavy blade that was about 17inches in length. The blade tapered to the round point and it had multiple fullers in order to strengthen it. The hand-guard had a curved shape with the concave facing the blade. The sword was short so as a result its pommel was very small.

Katzbalger Sword - The Katzbalger sword belongs to the arming sword group. This type of sword was in use in Germany, during the Renaissance period and it was the companion to the Landsknecht Flamberge sword. In the battle, the sword was used as the last resort weapon. The sword had rather wide blade and measured between approximately 30 to 33 inches in length. The sword weight was between 2.2 to 4.4lbs. The Katzbalger sword featured an S-shaped, twisted crossguard.

Kilij Sword - Kilij was a sword that was used by the Ottoman Turks and the Mamluks of Egypt. Kilij was the first sword with a curved blade that was introduced to Arabs, Persians and other Middle Eastern cultures. The kilij is the prototype sword from which many other blades were developed including the famous Persian shamshir. The original Kilij featured a blade that was narrow from the hilt to about ¾ of the blade where it flared out and then tapered again until the sharp point at the end of the blade. The characteristic flare-out formed a tip at the back of the blade. That tip was called “yelman”. The flare-out added a lot of cutting force to the blade. The pommel of the sword was curved towards the back of the sword. Kilij blades were often made from Damascene steel. Kilij type sword was also introduced to Europe by the Turkish conquests. Blades similar to Kilij were used by the Hungarians and Poles. Polish “Karabela” is an example of such adoption. Similarly during the Napoleonic Wars the French adapted this type of sabre for their light cavalry. Eventually the Kilij type blades made their way to Britain.

Kriegsmesser Sword - The Kriegsmesser was a large, two-handed, one-edged sword that was slightly curved. The Kriegsmesser simply looked like an oversized knife. The sword has its origins in the European Seax knife and the Falchion. The Falchion failed with its popularity in Germany and the big, knife-like sword developed on its own. The name of the sword, Kriegsmesser, means literally “war knife”. The sword really deserves this name as the hilt of the sword looks like an oversized knife handle. The pommel of the sword usually was curved to one side. The handle was made of two pieces of wood or bone, with full tang between them. The guard of the sword frequently was made of steel ring or plate or cruciform corssguard.

Two-handed Claymore Sword - One of the most famous two-handed swords was the claymore sword. The word claymore is derived from the Gaelic word “claidheamh mòr” meaning “great sword”. The name claymore actually refers to two types of swords. One of the swords is the two-handed longsword and the other one refers to much shorter and single-handed basked-hilted sword. The basket-hilted claymore sword was first used in the 16th century. This type of sword is still used as a part of the ceremonial dress of the Scottish highland regiments. The two-handed highland claymore sword was used during the late Medieval Age and in the Renaissance. This longsword was used in the wars between Scottish clans and the wars with the English. The Scottish claymore had distinctive design that featured a cross-hilt with downward sloping arms. The arms of the cross-hilt often ended with four-leaf clover design. There were also other, less known, claymore swords that had a very different, clamshell hilt design. An average, two-handed claymore sword was about 55 inches in length where the blade part measured 42 inches and the hilt measured 13 inches. The weight of the claymore was about 5.5lbs.


Cinquedea, Short Sword

The Cinquedea has held a long fascination for everybody at Cold Steel®. It gained popularity as the sidearm of choice for noblemen walking through the narrow alleyways and walled cities of Italy. A blade worn exclusively for civilian self-defense, it was essentially the precursor to the civilian side sword and the rapier - and yet, this instrument of personal protection seems to have owed much of its design to fashion as it did to the cut and thrust of mortal combat!

Surviving examples of these unusual short handled and steeply tapered blades are often highly embellished and ornate with etched or gilded blades and deep multiple fullers that border on jewelry rather than weaponry. But beneath the romanticisms of High Renaissance fashion lay a tool made with purpose. A wide, stiff cut-and-thrust blade that could be brought into play in confined spaces and deliver a mortal wound!

Cold Steel®'s interpretation of the Cinquedea is made from expertly heat-treated 1065 high carbon steel with highly engraved guard and pommel and a hand-carved Malaysian sal wood grip. The Cinquedea is sold complete with a leather scabbard with engraved steel throat and chape.

Details:
- Material: 1065 high carbon steel
- Overall length: approx. 52 cm
- Blade length: approx. 36.8 cm
- Blade thickness: approx. 3 mm
- Handle: approx. 15.2 cm long, sal wood
- Weight: approx. 814 g
- Incl. leather scabbard with steel fittings
- Cold Steel® Product No.: 88CDEA

Please note:
We do not sell this product to customers under the age of 18. Please provide your birth date when ordering. We'll also need a copy of your ID-card or passport by email, scan, fax or mail.


Cinquedea, Short Sword

The Cinquedea has held a long fascination for everybody at Cold Steel®. It gained popularity as the sidearm of choice for noblemen walking through the narrow alleyways and walled cities of Italy. A blade worn exclusively for civilian self-defense, it was essentially the precursor to the civilian side sword and the rapier - and yet, this instrument of personal protection seems to have owed much of its design to fashion as it did to the cut and thrust of mortal combat!

Surviving examples of these unusual short handled and steeply tapered blades are often highly embellished and ornate with etched or gilded blades and deep multiple fullers that border on jewelry rather than weaponry. But beneath the romanticisms of High Renaissance fashion lay a tool made with purpose. A wide, stiff cut-and-thrust blade that could be brought into play in confined spaces and deliver a mortal wound!

Cold Steel®'s interpretation of the Cinquedea is made from expertly heat-treated 1065 high carbon steel with highly engraved guard and pommel and a hand-carved Malaysian sal wood grip. The Cinquedea is sold complete with a leather scabbard with engraved steel throat and chape.

Details:
- Material: 1065 high carbon steel
- Overall length: approx. 52 cm
- Blade length: approx. 36.8 cm
- Blade thickness: approx. 3 mm
- Handle: approx. 15.2 cm long, sal wood
- Weight: approx. 814 g
- Incl. leather scabbard with steel fittings
- Cold Steel® Product No.: 88CDEA

Please note:
We do not sell this product to customers under the age of 18. Please provide your birth date when ordering. We'll also need a copy of your ID-card or passport by email, scan, fax or mail.


Cinquedea

The Cinquedea [Ching-kwi-dey-uh] has held a long fascination here at Cold Steel. It gained popularity as the sidearm of choice for noblemen walking through the narrow alleyways and walled cities of Italy. A blade worn exclusively for civilian self-defense it was essentially the precursor to the civilian side sword and the rapier - and yet this instrument of personal protection seems to have owed much of its design to fashion as it did to the cut and thrust of mortal combat!

Surviving examples of these unusual short handled and steeply tapered blades are often highly embellished and ornate. With etched or gilded blades and deep multiple fullers that border on jewelry rather than weaponry - but beneath the romanticisms of high renaissance fashion lay a tool made with purpose. A wide stiff cut and thrust blade that could be brought into play in confined spaces and deliver a mortal wound!

Cold Steel's interpretation of the Cinquedea is made from expertly heat treated 1055 Carbon steel with a highly engraved guard and pommel and a hand-carved rosewood grip. The Cinquedea is sold complete with a leather scabbard with engraved steel throat and chape.

- Blade Length: 14 1/2"
- Blade Thick: 1/8"
- Overall Length: 20 1/2"
- Steel: 1090 High Carbon
- Weight: 28.7 oz
- Handle: 6"
- Leather Scabbard With Engraved Steel Fittings

The Cinquedea [Ching-kwi-dey-uh] has held a long fascination here at Cold Steel. It gained popularity as the sidearm of choice for noblemen walking through the narrow alleyways and walled cities of Italy. A blade worn exclusively for civilian self-defense it was essentially the precursor to the civilian side sword and the rapier - and yet this instrument of personal protection seems to have owed much of its design to fashion as it did to the cut and thrust of mortal combat!

Surviving examples of these unusual short handled and steeply tapered blades are often highly embellished and ornate. With etched or gilded blades and deep multiple fullers that border on jewelry rather than weaponry - but beneath the romanticisms of high renaissance fashion lay a tool made with purpose. A wide stiff cut and thrust blade that could be brought into play in confined spaces and deliver a mortal wound!

Cold Steel's interpretation of the Cinquedea is made from expertly heat treated 1055 Carbon steel with a highly engraved guard and pommel and a hand-carved rosewood grip. The Cinquedea is sold complete with a leather scabbard with engraved steel throat and chape.

- Blade Length: 14 1/2"
- Blade Thick: 1/8"
- Overall Length: 20 1/2"
- Steel: 1090 High Carbon
- Weight: 28.7 oz
- Handle: 6"
- Leather Scabbard With Engraved Steel Fittings


Cinquedea Class

Similar to the newer "Arbalest" type the Cinquedea is a stripped down Neeran Super Heavy with a flatter profile and more powerful engines. They're a dedicated gunship, mounting additional turrets and missile batteries. Intel reports indicate there may be hard points that could be upgraded in the future heavier guns.

With its increase in engine and firepower the design is less able in the role of a Super Carrier. Newer tendencies for Neeran ships to carry detachable turret-corvettes may make up for these shortcomings.


There May Be No Time Like Now to Buy a Bill Moran Knife

A coveted ST-24 by Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Fame© member Bill Moran in wire inlay and checkering comes with a classic silver-half-moon leather sheath. Moran used the “W.F. Moran” stamp starting in 1980, typically on larger knives. It is not seen much anymore. (Dave Ellis photo)

By Dave Ellis

I still see Blade Magazine Cutlery Hall-Of-Fame© member Bill Moran each time I hold one of my many Moran knives. I miss visiting with Bill at the BLADE Show and the Art Knife Invitational. I miss showing him my latest Moran acquisition and watching his eyes light up as he explained how the knife came about.

I have collected a wide variety of Moran knives over the past 30 years. The one I have found the easiest to resell because of their collectibility and historical importance, in no particular order, are the ST-24, cinquedea, Southwestern bowies, 50-year anniversary editions, his damascus pieces, folders—he made fewer than 50—and quillon daggers, especially those in damascus.

In general, the more contemporary the Moran knife, the greater its value and collectibility. However, the cinquedea is an important exclusion to this rule. Bill made only about seven of them and most or all have Lime Kiln stamps, which indicates the knives were made sometime between the mid-1950s and 1973. I have sold a Moran cinquedea for over $30,000.

Some of the features that increase Moran knife values are wire-inlaid handles and sheaths, accompanying display boxes made by Bill, the knives that appear in the book written by Cutlery Hall-Of-Famers B.R. Hughes and Houston Price, Master of the Forge, the 50-yrs. stamping, and the newer raised-leather-style sheaths.

Since Bill’s passing in 2006, his knives have had a slight increase in value, though nowhere near the jump that will occur down the road. Many of his pieces are finding their way to China, Russia and other countries. Bill was never a prolific maker, so with the limited number of knives he made, those that hit the market are coveted by collectors and dealers alike.

Damascus Moran knives are in a class of their own. Bill is recognized as the father of modern damascus and his pattern-welded blades are highly prized, and can range from a low of $7,000 to upwards of $60,000! His damascus fighters and bowies seem to be the most desirable, followed by daggers and hunters.

Curly maple is a common Moran handle material, so when you can buy one in stag or other materials, it typically costs a premium.

The knives from the 1990s are probably among the finest to leave the Moran shop. They are lighter and quicker in the hand than Lime Kiln models and usually come with the newer-style sheaths. If you are lucky enough to find one with the 50 yrs. marking, you will see that it demands a premium.

The future looks very bright for those collecting Moran knives. You can still pick up a great example at a reasonable price and rest assured that it will increase in value down the road.

Bill made his knives one at a time by hand, no apprentices, no newfangled tools. His forge, anvil and hammer should reside in the Smithsonian!

For more information on Moran knives and their values, contact the author at 760-945-7177 or visit his website, exquisiteknives.com.

For more on the latest knives, knife legislation, knifemaking instruction, knife trends, knifemakers, what knives to buy and where and much more, subscribe to BLADE® Magazine, the World’s No. 1 Knife Publication. For subscription information click on http://www.shopblade.com/product/blade-magazine-one-year-subscripti…?r+ssfb022312#BL1SU

Moran Knife Values

Carbon steel hunters $4,000-$10,000

Carbon steel fighters (ST-23 and ST-24) $10,000-$25,000

Carbon steel bowies (Southwestern bowies can bring the upper range, $6,000-$35,000

especially with composite stag handles)

Carbon steel folders $15,000-$25,000+

Best Buys for Blade Readers:

Affordable Automatics from $29.99 smkw.com Knife Sharpeners from $2.99 smkw.com

Disclosure: These links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group earns a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you!

Damascus hunters $7,000-$20,000

Damascus fighters $18,000-$70,000

Damascus bowies $18,000-$40,000

Damascus folders (extremely rare) $20,000-“to way up there”

*All values are the author’s. Features such as matched sets, gold wire inlay—which is especially rare—special stampings and logos, handle materials and blade materials can have an impact on value.

Moran Tang Stamps

Most of Bill Moran’s knives can be valued based on their tang stamps. The rule of thumb is that newer Moran knives bring higher values. The author values each stamp using a star system, with five stars being the most valuable, four stars the next most valuable, etc.

•Damascus—Bill started using this stamp in 1973 and discontinued it around 1979. It was always used along with the MORAN stamp: 4-5 Stars

•50 yrs.—Starting in 1989, Bill began his 50-years knife project. The stamp appears only on 50 knives celebrating his 50 th anniversary of knifemaking: 4-5 Stars

•WFM—Bill’s first stamp used in the late 1940s: 4 Stars

•MORAN—He started using this stamp in 1973 and still uses it today: 3-4 Stars

•M.S.—Denotes a master smith with the American Bladesmith Society, first used by Bill in 1981: 3-4 Stars

•W.F. Moran—Bill used this stamp starting in 1980, typically on larger knives. It is not seen much anymore: 3-4 Stars

•Moran (small print)—Bill used it on his miniature knives: 3 Stars

•By W.F. Moran, Lime Kiln MD—This is a common stamping first used in the mid-1950s and continued until 1973: 2-3 Stars

Moran Sheaths

Depending on materials used and how they are made, the sheaths can add significant value to a Bill Moran knife. The author values each sheath using a star system, with five stars being the most valuable, four stars the next most valuable, etc.

•Wooden sheath with silver wire inlay: 5 Stars

•New style wood-lined leather sheath with raised leather design: 4-5 Stars

•Wood-lined leather sheath with throat and tip (steel or ivory is better than brass for fittings): 4 Stars

•Wood-lined leather sheath: 3-4 Stars (rating varies depending on the quality of the half moon and other accouterments)


Men&aposs Hats of the 20th Century

Men&aposs fashions retained a classic simplicity well into the 20th century. The Edwardian era introduced a casual informality into western styles for men and women. Men&aposs formal attire still included a top hat, but the stiff starched styles of the Victorian era disappeared as the century wore on.

Many hat styles of the early to mid 20th century had been introduced in the late 1800s.

The boater was a summer hat with a flat crown and round brim. Plaited straw was sewn in a spiral, stiffened, and blocked into a debonair yet informal look.

The Panama was another summer hat worn at the turn of the 20th century. Woven of fine straw, the soft, broad brimmed hat could be rolled into a tube for travel. Cheaper, fabric versions are still popular today.

The Homburg was a German version of the bowler with a slightly higher, dented crown.

The Trilby was a combination of a Hamburg and an Alpine type hat named after a character in George du Maurier&aposs play, "Trilby," of 1884. The hat was made of soft felt with a narrow brim that was turned up in back and down in the front. Though originally a bohemian style, the hat became the iconic symbol of the American businessman and journalist well into midcentury when no suit was complete without one.

The American Fedora was a felt hat similar to a Trilby but with a broader brim. The Fedora is the hat of movie gangsters, often seen worn by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and was popular mid century.

The baseball cap, a peaked cloth cap, once worn by members and supporters of baseball teams became the most popular hat of the late 20th century. In the late 1980&aposs it became a merchandising tool for sports teams, movies, and clothing brands. Wearing the cap backwards or sideways signified cool.


Watch the video: Forged in Fire: Beat the Judges: DAMASCUS STEEL CINQUEDEA CHALLENGE Season 1. History


Comments:

  1. Jess

    I congratulate, a magnificent idea

  2. Queran

    There is something in this. I will know, thanks a lot for the explanation.

  3. Breanainn

    I do not like, again



Write a message