Stormes DD-780 - History

Stormes DD-780 - History


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Stormes DD-780

Stormes(DD-780: dp. 2,200, 1. 376'6"; b. 40'10"; dr. 14'5", s. 34 k.; cpl. 345; a. 6 5", 12 40mm., 11 20mm., 2 dct.6 dc p., 10 21"tt.; cl. Allen M. Sumner)Stormes (DD-780) was laid down on 25 July 1943 by Todd-Pacific Shipyards Inc., Seattle, Wash.launched on 4 November 1944; sponsored by Mrs. M. C. Stormes; and commissioned on 27 January 1945, Comdr. William N. Wylie in command.Stormes was fitted out at Seattle and departed there on 14 February for the San Diego Bay area where she held her shakedown training. Upon completion of her shakedown, she sailed on 1 April for Bremerton for a post-shakedown overhaul. Dock trials were held on the morning of the 22d; and, that afternoon, the destroyer put to sea, en route to Hawaii.Stormes arrived at Pearl Harbor on 30 April and sailed the next day as escort for Louisville (CW-28) en route to Okinawa, via Guam. The two ships arrived at Hagushi anchorage on 23 May and joined the 5th Fleet. The destroyer was immediately assigned to the antiaircraft screen. She spent the night in the anchorage and took her position in the screen the next day. The ship underwent her first air raid that evening. The weather was bad on the morning of 25 May with poor visibility and intermittent rain squalls. At 0905, a Japanese plane was sighted as it passed between two Navy planes and headed for Ammen (DD-527) directly ahead of Stormes. At the last moment, the plane turned and crashed into Stormes's aft torpedo mount. Its bomb exploded in the magazine under her number three 5-inch mount. The ship was on fire, and sea water poured through holes in the hull. By noon repair parties had extinguished the fires and plugged the holes. Twenty-one members of the crew were killed and 15 injured.The battered destroyer slowly made her way back toKerama Retto. She remained there until 5 July when she moved to Buckner Bay to enter a floating drydock. The ship left drydock on 13 August and was sufficiently seaworthy for the long trip back to the United States, even though only her port shaft was in commission. Stormes stood out of Buckner Bay on 17 August and steamed, via Saipan, Eniwetok, and Pearl Harbor, to San Francisco. She arrived at Hunters Point on 17 September and began a three-month overhaul.The destroyer held refresher training in the San Diego area and, in January 1946, sailed for the east coast. She arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on 14 January, and, before continuing to Norfolk, acted as a plane guard for aircraft carriers holding shakedown operations in the area.Stormes arrived at Norfolk on 1 February and spent the remainder of the month preparing for Operation "Frostbite" which was to take place in March. Midwa'(CVB-41), a tanker, Stormes, and two other destroyers, moved into an area between Greenland, Labrador, and Hudson Strait in March to test carrier operations in sub-zero temperatures. Upon completion of the operation, Stormes steamed to the Brooklyn Navy Yard for upkeep. On 11 April, she sailed to Casco Bay, Maine, for training and returned for a major overhaul. On 22 July, she sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training and returned to Norfolk on 9 September. In October 1946, the destroyer escorted the Philippine Sea (CV-47) to Guantanamo Bay for the carrier's shakedown.In January 1947, Stormes participated in an exercise at Guantanamo Bay and returned to the Caribbean the following month for a fleet exercise. The destroyer carried out routine fleet duties from her Norfolk base until 1950. In August, she sailed to Charleston, S.C., for inactivation.However, she was reactivated in September due to the Korean war. In December 1950, she began a three-month yard overhaul at Charleston which was followed by a six-week shakedown cruise. In May 1951 the destroyer sailed to the west coast and was route] onward to join the 7th Fleet off Korea.Stormes operated with Task Force 77, shelling enemy lines, screening large fleet units, rescuing downed pilots and performing antisubmarine duties until January 1952 when she returned to Norfolk.Stormes made a midshipman cruise to England and France that summer and then operated along the Atlantic seaboard until June 1953 when she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for a four-month yard period and its subsequent shakedown. In February 1954, the destroyer embarked on a world cruise which took her to Naples, Suez, Port Said, Aden, Colombo, Singapore, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Midway, and Pearl Harbor. She reached San Francisco in July and returned to Norfolk in August.Stormes sailed, on 4 January 1955, for the Caribbean to participate in Operation "Springboard 55." She operated with Valley Forge (CVS-45) in Antisubmarine Group 3 from 4 January to August. The destroyer participated in a NATO exercise in early September and then continued local operations until February 1956 when she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard. Stormes left the shipyard in May and sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training which lasted until July. From then to November, the ship participated in local exercises to maintain her state of readiness in anticipation of an overseas tour.On 7 November, Stormes sailed with Destroyer Division 261 and arrived at Naples, Italy a month later where she was attached to the 6th Fleet. She served with the fast carriers in the Mediterranean until returning to Norfolk on 20 February 1957. The ship operated along the east coast until 3 September when she sailed as part of an attack carrier strike force for Operation "Seaspray." After crossing the North Atlantic, the ships arrived at the River Clyde, Scotland,where a number of NATO ships were waiting to take part in Operation "Strikeback." The operation ended in late September, and the destroyer sailed to Gibraltar to join the 6th Fleet for her second tour which ended at Norfolk on 22 December 1957.Stormes remained in port until 27 January 1958 when she embarked on a two week exercise with other ships of DesDiv 261. The remainder of the year and part of 1959 saw the. destroyer taking part in local and fleet operations from New York to the Caribbean. On 7 August 1959, she sailed for her third tour with the 6th Fleet which terminated upon her return to Norfolk on 26 February 1960. The ship entered the Navy Yard on 3 June for a FRAM II conversion which lasted until 5 January 1961. On the 24th, she sailed for Guantanamo Bay where she held refresher training, gunnery practice, and participated in group exercises.Stormes sailed for Norfolk, via Key West, and arrived there on 1 April. She operated with fleet units on the east coast and in the Caribbean for the remainder of the year. The highlight of the year's activities came in November when Stormes was designated to recover a spacecraft carrying a chimpanzee named Enos. The spacecraft landed approximately 30 miles from the destroyer. Stormes, aided by an aircraft which had the capsule in sight, recovered it and Enos who was in good health. She spent the next year operating with Task Group Alfa, a hunter-killer group developing the antisubmarine readiness of the Fleet.On 9 November 1962, Stormes joined the Cuban Blockade and continued that duty until tensions eased. She then resumed her regular operations. In August of the following year, "the 780" became the first United States ship to visit Santa Marta, Colombia, since 1830. In the latter part of 1963, she underwent an overhaul. She operated with Task Group Alfa in 1964 until October when she participated in Operation "Steelpike." Her task group acted as the hunter-killer group that preceded the main body of ships as they crossed the Atlantic.Stormes continued operating with Task Group Alfa until May 1965 when she was ordered to patrol the coastal waters of the Dominican Republic during the revolution there. When relieved of patrol duty, she returned to Norfolk and prepared for a deployment period. She was with the 6th Fleet from June to August and returned to her home port in early September. On 1 June 1966, Stormes stood out of Norfolk with DesRon 32 for a six and one-half month deployment to the western Pacific.While in WestPac, Stormes' primary duty was plane guard for Constellation (CVA-64) in the Tonkin Gulf. At one time, she was called on to provide gunfire support to ground forces ashore for a three-day period. She returned to Norfolk, via the Mediterranean, on 17 December 1966. After east coast operations in the spring and summer of 1967, Stormes deployed to the 6th Fleet from 14 November 1967 to 23 April 1968. She sailed to South America in July 1968 to hold antisubmarine warfare operations and to visit ports in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and St. Lucia Island. After resuming her normal operations from Norfolk in September, Stormes deployed to the Mediterranean with DesRon 32 on 6 January 1969. The six-month tour ended upon her return to Norfolk on 31 May. The remainder of the year and into June 1970, she operated from her home port.When Stormes returned to Norfolk from her last east coast port call on 18 June, she began preparing for inactivation.Stormes was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 5 December 1970. She was struck from the Navy list on 16 February 1972. Stormes was sold to Iran on 16 February 1972 and serves that country's government as Palang (DDG-9).Stormes received one battle star for World War II, three for service in Korea, and one for service in Vietnam.


Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

Max Clifford Stormes-born on 27 July 1903 in Big Flats, N.Y.--was appointed midshipman on 15 June 1920 and graduated on 15 May 1924. He was assigned to Nevada (BB-36) and subsequently served in Chewink (AM-39) and S-33.

Stormes served with Submarine Division 20 in 1929 and 1930 and then attended a post-graduate course at the Naval Academy in 1931 and 1932. His next tour of sea duty was as commanding officer of Talbot (TB-15) followed by a tour in Chicago (CA-29) as damage control officer.

Stormes became commanding officer of Preston (DD-379) on 31 October 1941 and was promoted to commander on 20 August 1942.

Comdr. Stormes was killed in action during the night of 14 and 15 November 1942, when Preston was sunk in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal. Comdr. Stormes was posthumously awarded the navy Cross as "his coolness and courage in the face of grave danger, inspired his men to supreme efforts of determination and endurance to carry on the attack."

(DD-780: dp. 2,200 l. 376'6" b. 40'10" dr. 14'5", s. 34 k. cpl. 345 a. 6 5", 12 40mm., 11 20mm., 2 dct., 6 dcp., 10 21" tt. cl. Allen M. Sumner)

Stormes (DD-780) was laid down on 25 July 1943 by Todd-Pacific Shipyards Inc., Seattle, Wash. launched on 4 November 1944 sponsored by Mrs. M. C. Stormes and commissioned on 27 January 1945, Comdr. William N. Wylie in command.

Stormes was fitted out at Seattle and departed there on 14 February for the San Diego Bay area where she held her shakedown training. Upon completion of her shakedown, she sailed on 1 April for Bremerton for a post-shakedown overhaul. Dock trials were held on the morning of the 22d and, that afternoon, the destroyer put to sea, en route to Hawaii.

Stormes arrived at Pearl Harbor on 30 April and sailed the next day as escort for Louisville (CL-28) en route to Okinawa, via Guam. The two ships arrived at Hagushi anchorage on 23 May and joined the 5th Fleet. The destroyer was immediately assigned to the antiaircraft screen. She spent the night in the anchorage and took her position in the screen the next day. The ship underwent her first air raid that evening. The weather was bad on the morning of 25 May with poor visibility and intermittent rain squalls. At 0905, a Japanese plane was sighted as it passed between two Navy planes and headed for Ammen (DD-527) directly ahead of Stormes. At the last moment, the plane turned and crashed into Stormes' aft torpedo mount. Its bomb exploded in the magazine under her number three 5-inch mount. The ship was on fire, and sea water poured through holes in the hull. By noon repair parties had extinguished the fires and plugged the holes. Twenty-one members of the crew were killed and 15 injured.

The battered destroyer slowly made her way back to Kerama Retto. She remained there until 5 July when she moved to Buckner Bay to enter a floating drydock. The ship left drydock on 13 August and was sufficiently seaworthy for the long trip back to the United States, even though only her port shaft was in commission. Stormes stood out of Buckner Bay on 17 August and steamed, via Saipan, Eniwetok, and Pearl Harbor, to San Francisco. She arrived at Hunters Point on 17 September and began a three-month overhaul.

The destroyer held refresher training in the San Diego area and, in January 1946, sailed for the east coast. She arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on 14 January, and, before continuing to Norfolk, acted as a plane guard for aircraft carriers holding shakedown operations in the area.

Stormes arrived at Norfolk on 1 February and spent the remainder of the month preparing for Operation "Frostbite" which was to take place in March. Midway (CVB-41), a tanker, Stormes, and two other destroyers, moved into an area between Greenland, Labrador, and Hudson Strait in March to test carrier operations in sub-zero temperatures. Upon completion of the operation, Stormes steamed to the Brooklyn Navy Yard for upkeep. On 11 April, she sailed to Casco Bay, Maine, for training and returned for a major overhaul. On 22 July, she sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training and returned to Norfolk on 9 September. In October 1946, the destroyer escorted the Philippine Sea (CV-47) to Guantanamo Bay for the carrier's shakedown.

In January 1947, Stormes participated in an exercise at Guantanamo Bay and returned to the Caribbean the following month for a fleet exercise. The destroyer carried out routine fleet duties from her Norfolk base until 1950. In August, she sailed to Charleston, S.C., for inactivation.

However, she was reactivated in September due to the Korean war. In December 1950, she began a three-month yard overhaul at Charleston which was followed by a six-week shakedown cruise. In May 1951 the destroyer sailed to the west coast and was routed onward to join the 7th Fleet off Korea.

Stormes operated with Task Force 77, shelling enemy lines, screening large fleet units, rescuing downed pilots and performing antisubmarine duties until January 1952 when she returned to Norfolk.

Stormes made a midshipman cruise to England and France that summer and then operated along the Atlantic seaboard until June 1953 when she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for a four-month yard period and its subsequent shakedown. In February 1954, the destroyer embarked on a world cruise which took her to Naples, Suez, Port Said, Aden, Colombo, Singapore, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Midway, and Pearl Harbor. She reached San Francisco in July and returned to Norfolk in August.

Stormes sailed, on 4 January 1955, for the Caribbean to participate in Operation "Springboard 55." She operated with Valley Forge (CVS-45) in Antisubmarine Group 3 from 4 January to August. The destroyer participated in a NATO exercise in early September and then continued local operations until February 1956 when she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard. Stormes left the shipyard in May and sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training which lasted until July. From then to November, the ship participated in local exercises to maintain her state of readiness in anticipation of an overseas tour.

On 7 November, Stormes sailed with Destroyer Division 261 and arrived at Naples, Italy a month later where she was attached to the 6th Fleet. She served with the fast carriers in the Mediterranean until returning to Norfolk on 20 February 1957. The ship operated along the east coast until 3 September when she sailed as part of an attack carrier strike force for Operation "Seaspray." After crossing the North Atlantic, the ships arrived at the River Clyde, Scotland, where a number of NATO ships were waiting to take part in Operation "Strikeback." The operation ended in late September, and the destroyer sailed to Gibraltar to join the 6th Fleet for her second tour which ended at Norfolk on 22 December 1957.

Stormes remained in port until 27 January 1958 when she embarked on a two week exercise with other ships of DesDiv 261. The remainder of the year and part of 1959 saw the. destroyer taking part in local and fleet operations from New York to the Caribbean. On 7 August 1959, she sailed for her third tour with the 6th Fleet which terminated upon her return to Norfolk on 26 February 1960. The ship entered the Navy Yard on 3 June for a FRAM II conversion which lasted until 5 January 1961. On the 24th, she sailed for Guantanamo Bay where she held refresher training, gunnery practice, and participated in group exercises.

Stormes sailed for Norfolk, via Key West, and arrived there on 1 April. She operated with fleet units on the east coast and in the Caribbean for the remainder of the year. The highlight of the year's activities came in November when Stormes was designated to recover a spacecraft carrying a chimpanzee named Enos. The spacecraft landed approximately 30 miles from the destroyer. Stormes, aided by an aircraft which had the capsule in sight, recovered it and Enos, who was in good health. She spent the next year operating with Task Group Alfa, a hunter-killer group developing the antisubmarine readiness of the Fleet.

On 9 November 1962, Stormes joined the Cuban Blockade and continued that duty until tensions eased. She then resumed her regular operations. In August of the following year, "the 780" became the first United States ship to visit Santa Marta, Colombia, since 1830. In the latter part of 1963, she underwent an overhaul. She operated with Task Group Alfa in 1964 until October when she participated in Operation "Steelpike." Her task group acted as the hunter-killer group that preceded the main body of ships as they crossed the Atlantic.

Stormes continued operating with Task Group Alfa until May 1965 when she was ordered to patrol the coastal waters of the Dominican Republic during the revolution there. When relieved of patrol duty, she returned to Norfolk and prepared for a deployment period. She was with the 6th Fleet from June to August and returned to her home port in early September. On 1 June 1966, Stormes stood out of Norfolk with DesRon 32 for a six and one-half month deployment to the western Pacific.

While in WestPac, Stormes' primary duty was plane guard for Constellation (CVA-64) in the Tonkin Gulf. At one time, she was called on to provide gunfire support to ground forces ashore for a three-day period. She returned to Norfolk, via the Mediterranean, on 17 December 1966. After east coast operations in the spring and summer of 1967, Stormes deployed to the 6th Fleet from 14 November 1967 to 23 April 1968. She sailed to South America in July 1968 to hold antisubmarine warfare operations and to visit ports in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and St. Lucia Island. After resuming her normal operations from Norfolk in September, Stormes deployed to the Mediterranean with DesRon 32 on 6 January 1969. The six-month tour ended upon her return to Norfolk on 31 May. The remainder of the year and into June 1970, she operated from her home port.

When Stormes returned to Norfolk from her last east coast port call on 18 June, she began preparing for inactivation.

Stormes was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 5 December 1970. She was struck from the Navy list on 16 February 1972. Stormes was sold to Iran on 16 February 1972 and serves that country's government as Palang (DDG-9).


Stormes DD-780 - History

USS Stormes , a 2,200-ton Allen M. Sumner -class destroyer built at Seattle, Washington, was commissioned in January 1945. After shakedown at San Diego and repairs at Bremerton, Washington, she sailed for Pearl Harbor in April 1945. From there the destroyer escorted Louisville (CA-28) to Okinawa. Upon arrival in late May, she was immediately assigned to the antiaircraft screen. During her first day on station, a Japanese suicide aircraft crashed into her after torpedo mount and detonated its bomb in the magazine under her after 5"/38 gun mount. After emergency repairs, Stormes sailed from Okinawa in August on one propeller shaft for full repairs at San Francisco.

Following refresher training, Stormes sailed in January 1946 for the east coast. In March 1946 she escorted Midway (CVB-41) during Operation Frostbite, a test of carrier operations in sub-zero temperatures. Following three years of routine Atlantic Fleet duties from her Norfolk base, the destroyer sailed to Charleston, S.C. in August 1950 for inactivation. In September 1950, however, Stormes was reactivated because of the Korean War. In May 1951 she sailed for the west coast and then joined the 7th Fleet. She returned to Norfolk in January 1952 after performing shore bombardment, carrier escort, pilot rescue, and ASW duties off Korea. Highlights of her Atlantic Fleet service during the remainder of the 1950s included a world cruise between February and August 1954, and three deployments to the Mediterranean between November 1956 and February 1957, September and December 1957, and August 1959 to February 1960.

Between June 1960 and January 1961 Stormes received a FRAM II conversion at the Norfolk Navy Yard, featuring the addition of facilities for a DASH drone ASW helicopter and a variable depth sonar on the stern. In November 1960 she recovered a spacecraft carrying a healthy chimpanzee named Enos. In November 1962 she took part in the blockade of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis. She returned to the Caribbean in May 1965 to patrol the coastal waters of the Dominican Republic during a revolution there. Following a deployment to the Mediterranean later in 1965, Stormes sailed from Norfolk in June 1966 for a deployment to the western Pacific, during which her primary duty was to serve as plane guard for Constellation (CVA-64) in the Tonkin Gulf. She returned to Norfolk via the Mediterranean in December 1966. The destroyer made two more deployments to the Mediterranean between November 1967 and April 1968, and January and May 1969, and also visited South America between July and September 1968.

Stormes began preparing for inactivation in June 1970 and was decommissioned in December 1970. She was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register and sold to Iran in February 1972. Renamed Palang (DDG-9), she was modified at Philadelphia Navy Yard, with the work including removal of number two 5"/38 gun mount and fitting of Standard surface-to-air missile launchers. Palang reportedly operated for the last time in 1994 and has since probably been hulked or scrapped.

This page features, and provides links to, all the views we have related to USS Stormes (DD-780).

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the digital images presented here, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Coming alongside USS Leyte (CV-32) for refueling during Operation "Frigid", 17 November 1948.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 63KB 740 x 615 pixels

Underway during the 1950s.

Courtesy of the Mariners Museum, Newport News, Virginia, from the Ted Stone collection.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 89KB 740 x 610 pixels

Underway during the 1960s.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 71KB 740 x 610 pixels

Underway on 3 November 1966.

Photographed by Chief Photographer's Mate D. L. Podbreger, USN, of USS Constellation (CVA-64).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 80KB 740 x 615 pixels

Underway on 3 November 1966.

Photographed by Chief Photographer's Mate D. L. Podbreger, USN, of USS Constellation (CVA-64).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 108KB 740 x 620 pixels

Underway on 3 November 1966.

Photographed by Chief Photographer's Mate D. L. Podbreger, USN, of USS Constellation (CVA-64).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 86KB 740 x 615 pixels

Underway on 3 November 1966.

Photographed by Chief Photographer's Mate D. L. Podbreger, USN, of USS Constellation (CVA-64).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 615 pixels

Coming alongside USS Altair (AKS-32) for replenishment in April 1968.

Received from USS Altair , 1969.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 77KB 740 x 520 pixels

Off Hampton Roads, Virginia, on 13 November 1968.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 76KB 740 x 570 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-K-61834.
Though reproductions of this photo from the Naval Historical Center's collections are available in black & white only, those from the National Archives should be available in color.

Off Hampton Roads, Virginia, on 13 November 1968.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 102KB 740 x 620 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-K-61835.
Though reproductions of this photo from the Naval Historical Center's collections are available in black & white only, those from the National Archives should be available in color.

Off Hampton Roads, Virginia, on 13 November 1968.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 82KB 740 x 620 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-K-61836.
Though reproductions of this photo from the Naval Historical Center's collections are available in black & white only, those from the National Archives should be available in color.

In addition to the images presented above, the National Archives appears to hold other views of USS Stormes (DD-780). The following list features some of these images:

The images listed below are NOT in the Naval Historical Center's collections.
DO NOT try to obtain them using the procedures described in our page "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions".

The following photographs were taken after Stormes had received her FRAM II modernization:

Reproductions of these images should be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system for pictures not held by the Naval Historical Center.


Korean War [ edit | edit source ]

However, she was reactivated in September due to the Korean War. In December 1950, she began a three-month yard overhaul at Charleston which was followed by a six-week shakedown cruise. In May 1951, the destroyer sailed to the west coast and was routed onward to join the 7th Fleet off Korea.

Stormes operated with Task Force 77, shelling enemy lines, screening large fleet units, rescuing downed pilots, and performing antisubmarine duties until January 1952 when she returned to Norfolk.

While on protection detail in Wonsan Harbor as support for the Marine observation team on a small island, The Stormes was involved in the rescue operation of a B-29 Bomber shot down by Migs while returning from a mission. Of the eleven man crew, seven of the crew were rescued, the others were killed outright by gun fire from the Migs. The survivors parachuted into the sea off the coast and subsequently picked up by The Stormes and other ships in the immediate area. The crew Master Sargent crew chief was having a hard time staying afloat. The rescue medic went into the water to help and found he was still wearing two belts containing all the tools for engine maintenance, if needed. The medic cut the belts loose to enable the other rescuers to bring him aboard the rescue boat. The mechanic was panicked because he was responsible for the equipment and was concerned that he would be charged to replace the tools. The Pilot in charge assured him it was an understandable loss and he would not have to pay for them, he relaxed.

eStormes made a midshipman cruise to England and France that summer and then operated along the Atlantic seaboard until June 1953 when she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for a four-month yard period and its subsequent shakedown. In February 1954, the destroyer embarked on a world cruise which took her to Naples, Suez, Port Said, Aden, Colombo, Singapore, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Midway, and Pearl Harbor. She reached San Francisco in July and returned to Norfolk in August.

Stormes sailed, on 4 January 1955, for the Caribbean to participate in Operation “Springboard 55.” She operated with Valley Forge (CVS-45) in Antisubmarine Group 3 from 4 January to August. The destroyer participated in a NATO exercise in early September and then continued local operations until February 1956 when she entered the Norfolk Navy-Yard. Stormes left the shipyard in May and sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training which lasted until July. From then to November, the ship participated in local exercises to maintain her state of readiness in anticipation of an overseas tour.

On 7 November, Stormes sailed with Destroyer Division 261 and arrived at Naples, Italy, a month later where she was attached to the 6th Fleet. She served with the fast carriers in the Mediterranean until returning to Norfolk on 20 February 1957. The ship operated along the east coast until 3 September when she sailed as part of an attack carrier strike force for Operation “Seaspray.” After crossing the North Atlantic, the ships arrived at the River Clyde, Scotland, where a number of NATO ships were waiting to take part in Operation “Strikeback.” The operation ended in late September, and the destroyer sailed to Gibraltar to join the 6th Fleet for her second tour which ended at Norfolk on 22 December 1957.

Stormes remained in port until 27 January 1958 when she embarked on a two-week exercise with other ships of DesDiv 261. The remainder of the year and part of 1959 saw the destroyer taking part in local and fleet operations from New York to the Caribbean. On 7 August 1959, she sailed for her third tour with the 6th Fleet which terminated upon her return to Norfolk on 26 February 1960. The ship entered the Navy Yard on 3 June for a FRAM II conversion which lasted until 5 January 1961. On the 24th, she sailed for Guantanamo Bay where she held refresher training, gunnery practice, and participated in group exercises.

Stormes sailed for Norfolk, via Key West, and arrived there on 1 April. She operated with fleet units on the east coast and in the Caribbean for the remainder of the year. The highlight of the year's activities came in November when Stormes was designated to recover a spacecraft carrying a chimpanzee named Enos. The spacecraft landed approximately 30 miles from the destroyer. Stormes, aided by an aircraft which had the capsule in sight, recovered it and Enos who was in good health. She spent the next year operating with Task Group Alpha, a hunter-killer group developing the antisubmarine readiness of the Fleet.

On 9 November 1962, Stormes joined the Cuban Blockade and continued that duty until the end of the Cuban Missile Crisis. She then resumed her regular operations. In August of the following year, “the 780” became the first United States ship to visit Santa Marta, Colombia, since 1880. In the latter part of 1963, she underwent an overhaul. She operated with Task Group Alpha in 1964 until October when she participated in Operation “Steel-pike.” Her task group acted as the hunter-killer group that preceded the main body of ships as they crossed the Atlantic.

Stormes continued operating with Task Group Alfa until May 1965 when she was ordered to patrol the coastal waters of the Dominican Republic during the revolution there. When relieved of patrol duty, she returned to Norfolk and prepared for a deployment period. She was with the 6th Fleet from June to August and returned to her homeport in early September. On 1 June 1966, Stormes stood out of Norfolk with DesRon 32 for a six and one-half month deployment to the western Pacific.


Vietnam

While in WestPac, her primary duty was plane guard for Constellation (CVA-64) in the Tonkin Gulf. At one time, she was called on to provide gunfire support to ground forces ashore for a three-day period. She returned to Norfolk, via the Mediterranean, on 17 December 1966. After east coast operations in the spring and summer of 1967, Stormes deployed to the 6th Fleet from 14 November 1967 to 23 April 1968. She sailed to South America in July 1968 to hold antisubmarine warfare operations as part of UNITAS IX and to visit ports in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and St. Lucia. After resuming her normal operations from Norfolk in September, Stormes deployed to the Mediterranean with DesRon 32 on 6 January 1969. The six-month tour ended upon her return to Norfolk on 31 May. The remainder of the year and into June 1970, she operated from her homeport as a dedicated participant of the Squeeze Play ASW exercises.

When Stormes returned to Norfolk from her last east coast port call on 18 June, she began preparing for inactivation.

Stormes was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 5 December 1970. She was struck from the Navy list on 16 February 1972. Stormes was sold to Iran on 16 February 1972 and serves that country's government as Palang (Leopard) (DDG-9).

Stormes received one battle star for World War II, three for service in Korea, and one for service in Vietnam.


Stormes DD-780 - History

(DD-780: dp. 2,200 l. 376'6" b. 40'10" dr. 14'5", s. 34 k. cpl. 345 a. 6 5", 12 40mm., 11 20mm., 2 dct., 6 dcp., 10 21 tt. cl. Allen M. Sumner)

Stormes (DD-780) was laid down on 25 July 1943 by Todd- Pacific Shipyards Inc., Seattle, Wash. launched on 4 November 1944, sponsored by Mrs. M. C. Stormes and commissioned on 27 January 1945, Comdr. William N. Wylie in command

Stormes was fitted out at Seattle and departed there on 14 February for the San Diego Bay area where she held her shakedown training. Upon completion of her shakedown, she sailed on 1 April for Bremerton for a post-shakedown overhaul. Dock trials were held on the morning of the 22d and, that afternoon, the destroyer put to sea, en route to Hawaii.

Stormes arrived at Pearl Harbor on 30 April and sailed the next day as escort for Louisville (CA-28) en route to Okinawa, via Guam. The two ships arrived at Hagushi anchorage on 23 May and joined the 5th Fleet. The destroyer was immediately assigned to the antiaircraft screen. She spent the night in the anchorage and took her position in the screen the next day. The ship underwent her first air raid that evening. The weather was bad on the morning of 25 May with poor visibility and intermittent rain squalls. At 0905, a Japanese plane was sighted as it passed between two Navy planes and headed for Ammen (DD-527) directly ahead of Stormes At the last moment, the plane turned and crashed into Stormes aft torpedo mount. Its bomb exploded in the magazine under her number three 5-inch mount. The ship was on fire, and sea water poured through holes in the hull. By noon, repair parties had extinguished the fires and plugged the holes. Twenty-one members of the crew were killed and 15 injured.

The battered destroyer slowly made her way back to Kerama Retto. She remained there until 5 July when she moved to Buckner Bay to enter a floating drydock. The ship left drydock on 13 August and was sufficiently seaworthy the for the long trip back to the United States, even though only her port shaft was in commission. Stormes stood out of Buckner Bay on 17 August and steamed, via Saipan, Eniwetok, and Pearl Harbor, to San Francisco. She arrived at Hunters Point on 17 September and began a three-month overhaul.

The destroyer held refresher training in the San Diego area and, in January 1946, sailed for the east coast. She arrived at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, on 14 January, and, before continuing to Norfolk, acted as a plane guard for aircraft carriers holding shakedown operations in the area.

Stormes arrived at Norfolk on 1 February and spent the remainder of the month preparing for Operation "Frostbite" which was to take place in March. Midway (CVB-41), a tanker, Stormes and two other destroyers, moved into an area between Greenland, Labrador, and Hudson Strait in March to test carrier operations in sub-zero temperatures. Upon completion of the operation, Stormes steamed to the Brooklyn Navy Yard for upkeep. On 11 April, she sailed to Casco Bay, Maine, for training and returned for a major overhaul. On 22 July, she sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training and returned to Norfolk on 9 September. In October 1946, the destroyer escorted the Philippine Sea (CV-47) to Guantanamo Bay for the carrier's shakedown.

In January 1947, Stormes participated in an exercise at Guantanamo Bay and returned to the Caribbean the following month for a fleet exercise. The destroyer carried out routine fleet duties from her Norfolk base until 1950. In August, she sailed to Charleston, S.C., for inactivation.

However, she was reactivated in September due to the Korean war. In December 1950, she began a three-month yard overhaul at Charleston which was followed by a six-week shakedown cruise. In May 1951, the destroyer sailed to the west coast and was routed onward to join the 7th Fleet off Korea.

Stormes operated with Task Force 77, shelling enemy lines, screening large fleet units, rescuing downed pilots, and performing antisubmarine duties until January 1952 when she returned to Norfolk.

Stormes made a midshipman cruise to England and France that summer and then operated along the Atlantic seaboard until June 1953 when she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard for a four-month yard period and its subsequent shakedown. In I February 1954, the destroyer embarked on a world cruise which took her to Naples, Suez, Port Said, Aden, Colombo, Singapore, Yokosuka, Sasebo, Midway, and Pearl Harbor. She reached San Francisco in July and returned to Norfolk in August.

Stormes sailed, on 4 January 1955, for the Caribbean to participate in Operation "Springboard 55." She operated with Valley Forge (CVS-45) in Antisubmarine Group 3 from 4 January to August. The destroyer participated in a NATO exercise in early September and then continued local operations until February 1956 when she entered the Norfolk Navy Yard. Stormes left the shipyard in May and sailed to Guantanamo Bay for refresher training which lasted until July. From then to November, the ship participated in local exercises to maintain her state of readiness in anticipation of an overseas tour.

On 7 November, Stormes sailed with Destroyer Division 261 and arrived at Naples, Italy, a month later where she was attached to the 6th Fleet. She served with the fast carriers in the Mediterranean until returning to Norfolk on 20 February 1957. The ship operated along the east coast until 3 September when she sailed as part of an attack carrier strike force for Operation "Seaspray." After crossing the North Atlantic, the ships arrived at the River Clyde, Scotland, where a number of NATO ships were waiting to take part in Operation "Strikeback." The operation ended in late September, and the destroyer sailed to Gibraltar to join the 6th Fleet for her second tour which ended at Norfolk on 22 December 1957.

Stormes remained in port until 27 January 1958 when she embarked on a two-week exercise with other ships of DesDiv 261. The remainder of the year and part of 1959 saw the destroyer taking part in local and fleet operations from New York to the Caribbean. On 7 August 1959, she sailed for her third tour with the 6th Fleet which terminated upon her return to Norfolk on 26 February 1960. The ship entered the Navy Yard on 3 June for a FRAM II conversion which lasted until 5 January 1961. On the 24th, she sailed for Guantanamo Bay where she held refresher training, gunnery practice, and participated in group exercises.

Stormes sailed for Norfolk, via Key West, and arrived there on 1 April. She operated with fleet units on the east coast and in the Caribbean for the remainder of the year. The highlight of the year's activities came in November when Stormes was designated to recover a spacecraft carrying a chimpanzee named Enos. The spacecraft landed approximately 30 miles from the destroyer. Stormes, aided by an aircraft which had the capsule in sight, recovered it and Enos who was in good health. She spent the next year operating with Task Group Alfa, a hunter-killer group developing the antisubmarine readiness of the Fleet.

On 9 November 1962, Stormes joined the Cuban Blockade and continued that duty until tensions eased. She then resumed her regular operations. In August of the following year, "the 780" became the first United States ship to visit Santa Marta, Colombia, since 1830. In the latter part of 1963, she underwent an overhaul. She operated with Task Group Alfa in 1964- until October when she participated in Operation "Steelpike." Her task group acted as the hunter-killer group that preceded the main body of ships as they crossed the Atlantic.

Stormes continued operating with Task Group Alfa until May 1965 when she was ordered to patrol the coastal waters of the Dominican Republic during the revolution there. When relieved of patrol duty, she returned to Norfolk and prepared for a deployment period. She was with the 6th Fleet from June to August and returned to her home port in early September. On 1 June 1966, Stormes stood out of Norfolk with DesRon 32 for a six and one-half month deployment to the western Pacific.

While in WestPac, Stormes' primary duty was plane guard for Constellation (CVA-64) in the Tonkin Gulf. At one time, she was called on to provide gunfire support to ground forces ashore for a three-day period. She returned to Norfolk, via the Mediterranean, on 17 December 1966. After east coast operations in the spring and summer of 1967, Stormes deployed to the 6th Fleet from 14 November 1967 to 23 April 1968. She sailed to South America in July 1968 to hold antisubmarine warfare operations and to visit ports in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and St. Lucia Island. After resuming her normal operations from Norfolk in September, Stormes deployed to the Mediterranean with DesRon 32 on 6 January 1969. The six-month tour ended upon her return to Norfolk on 31 May. The remainder of the year and into June 1970, she operated from her home port.

When Stormes returned to Norfolk from her last east coast port call on 18 June, she began preparing for inactivation. Stormes was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 5 December 1970. She was struck from the Navy list on 16 February 1972. Stormes was sold to Iran on 16 February 1972 and serves that country's government as Palang (DDG-9).

Stormes received one battle star for World War II, three for service in Korea, and one for service in Vietnam


USS Stormes (DD 780)

Decommissioned 5 December 1970.
Stricken 16 February 1972.
Transferred to Iran 16 February 1972 being renamed Palang.

Commands listed for USS Stormes (DD 780)

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CommanderFromTo
1T/Cdr. William Naylor Wylie, USN27 Jan 19454 May 1947

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Notable events involving Stormes include:

14 Feb 1945
USS Stormes departed from Seattle bound for San Diego.

1 Apr 1945
With her shakedown at San Diego completed USS Stormes sails to the Bremerton Navy Yard.

22 Apr 1945
USS Stormes departed from the Bremerton Navy Yard bound for Pearl Harbor.

30 Apr 1945
USS Stormes arrived at Pearl Harbor.

23 May 1945
USS Stormes arrived in the Okinawa area.

25 May 1945
USS Stormes is hit by a Japanese kamikaze aircraft in position 27°06'N, 127°38'E. 21 of her crew were killed and 15 were injured. The damaged destroyer limped into Kerama Retto.

5 Jul 1945
After being patched up USS Stormes moves to Buckner Bay where she enters a floating dry-dock.

13 Aug 1945
USS Stormes leaves the floating dry-dock at Buckner Bay.

17 Aug 1945
USS Stormes departed from Buckner Bay bound for the Hunters Point Navy Yard for full repairs and overhaul.

17 Sep 1945
USS Stormes arrived at the Hunters Point Navy Yard.

Media links


After the War

On January 4, 1955, the ship steamed to the Caribbean to take part in Operation “Springboard 55.” She operated with Valley Forge (CVS-45) in Antisubmarine Group 3 from January into August. On September 3, 1957, the Stormes took part in an attack carrier strike force for Operation Seaspray. The convoy then crossed the North Atlantic to the River Clyde in Scotland and joined a NATO fleet and participated in Operation Strikeback.

In 1962, the Stormes was chosen to recover a spacecraft carrying a chimpanzee named Enos. The spacecraft touched down about 30 miles from the ship, and aided by an aircraft, the destroyer recovered the capsule with Enos intact and healthy. Later, she joined with Task Group Alfa in 1964 and took part in Operation Steel-pike in October of that year. Her task group acted as the hunter-killer force that led the fleet across the Atlantic. The USS Stormes was decommissioned on December 5, 1970, and struck from the naval register two years later. She was subsequently sold to Iran, where she served as the Palang DDG-9 until 1994. While in U.S. service, the Stormes received one battle star for World War II, three for service in Korea, and one for service in Vietnam.


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Product Description

USS Stormes DD 780

World Cruise

3 Feb 1954 - August 1954 Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

This CD will Exceed your Expectations

A great part of Naval history.

You would be purchasing an exact copy of the USS Stormes DD 780 cruise book during this time period. Each page has been placed on a CD for years of enjoyable computer viewing. The CD comes in a plastic sleeve with a custom label. Every page has been enhanced and is readable. Rare cruise books like this sell for a hundred dollars or more when buying the actual hard copy if you can find one for sale.

This would make a great gift for yourself or someone you know who may have served aboard her. Usually only ONE person in the family has the original book. The CD makes it possible for other family members to have a copy also. You will not be disappointed we guarantee it.

Some of the items in this book are as follows:

  • Ports of Call: Naples, Port Said, Aden, Columbo, Singapore, Yokosuka, Kobe and Sasebo Japan, Midway Island, pearl Harbor, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Norfolk.
  • Divisional Group Photos
  • Brief History of the Ship
  • Operations at Sea
  • Crossing the Equator
  • Crew Roster
  • Many Crew Activity Photos
  • Plus Much More

Over 254 Photos on Approximately 70 Pages.

Once you view this book you will know what life was like on this Destroyer during this time period.

Additional Bonus:

  • 20 Minute Audio of a " 1967 Equator Crossing " (Not this ship but the Ceremony is Traditional)
  • Several Additional Images of the USS Stormes DD 780 (National Archives)
  • 6 Minute Audio of " Sounds of Boot Camp " in the late 50's early 60's
  • Other Interesting Items Include:
    • The Oath of Enlistment
    • The Sailors Creed
    • Core Values of the United States Navy
    • Military Code of Conduct
    • Navy Terminology Origins (8 Pages)
    • Examples: Scuttlebutt, Chewing the Fat, Devil to Pay,
    • Hunky-Dory and many more.

    Why a CD instead of a hard copy book?

    • The pictures will not be degraded over time.
    • Self contained CD no software to load.
    • Thumbnails, table of contents and index for easy viewing reference.
    • View as a digital flip book or watch a slide show. (You set the timing options)
    • Back ground patriotic music and Navy sounds can be turned on or off.
    • Viewing options are described in the help section.
    • Bookmark your favorite pages.
    • The quality on your screen may be better than a hard copy with the ability to magnify any page.
    • Full page viewing slide show that you control with arrow keys or mouse.
    • Designed to work on a Microsoft platform. (Not Apple or Mac) Will work with Windows 98 or above.

    Personal Comment from "Navyboy63"

    The cruise book CD is a great inexpensive way of preserving historical family heritage for yourself, children or grand children especially if you or a loved one has served aboard the ship. It is a way to get connected with the past especially if you no longer have the human connection.

    If your loved one is still with us, they might consider this to be a priceless gift. Statistics show that only 25-35% of sailors purchased their own cruise book. Many probably wished they would have. It's a nice way to show them that you care about their past and appreciate the sacrifice they and many others made for you and the FREEDOM of our country. Would also be great for school research projects or just self interest in World War II documentation.

    We never knew what life was like for a sailor in World War II until we started taking an interest in these great books. We found pictures which we never knew existed of a relative who served on the USS Essex CV 9 during World War II. He passed away at a very young age and we never got a chance to hear many of his stories. Somehow by viewing his cruise book which we never saw until recently has reconnected the family with his legacy and Naval heritage. Even if we did not find the pictures in the cruise book it was a great way to see what life was like for him. We now consider these to be family treasures. His children, grand children and great grand children can always be connected to him in some small way which they can be proud of. This is what motivates and drives us to do the research and development of these great cruise books. I hope you can experience the same thing for your family.


    Vietnam

    While in WestPac, her primary duty was plane guard for Constellation (CVA-64) in the Tonkin Gulf. At one time, she was called on to provide gunfire support to ground forces ashore for a three-day period. She returned to Norfolk, via the Mediterranean, on 17 December 1966. After east coast operations in the spring and summer of 1967, Stormes deployed to the 6th Fleet from 14 November 1967 to 23 April 1968. She sailed to South America in July 1968 to hold antisubmarine warfare operations as part of UNITAS IX and to visit ports in Puerto Rico, Brazil, and St. Lucia. After resuming her normal operations from Norfolk in September, Stormes deployed to the Mediterranean with DesRon 32 on 6 January 1969. The six-month tour ended upon her return to Norfolk on 31 May. The remainder of the year and into June 1970, she operated from her homeport as a dedicated participant of the Squeeze Play ASW exercises.

    When Stormes returned to Norfolk from her last east coast port call on 18 June, she began preparing for inactivation.

    Stormes was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 5 December 1970. She was struck from the Navy list on 16 February 1972. Stormes was sold to Iran on 16 February 1972 and serves that country's government as Palang (DDG-9).

    Stormes received one battle star for World War II, three for service in Korea, and one for service in Vietnam.


    Watch the video: DESTROYER USS STORMES DD-780: History