USS Schley (DD-103) after refit, 1943

USS Schley (DD-103) after refit, 1943


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U.S. Destroyers: An Illustrated Design History, Norman Friedmann .The standard history of the development of American destroyers, from the earliest torpedo boat destroyers to the post-war fleet, and covering the massive classes of destroyers built for both World Wars. Gives the reader a good understanding of the debates that surrounded each class of destroyer and led to their individual features.


USS Schley (DD-103)

USS Schley (DD-103) was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War I and later designated, APD-14 in the World War II. She was the first ship named in honor of Winfield Scott Schley.

Schley was laid down on 29 October 1917 by Union Iron Works, San Francisco, California launched on 28 March 1918 sponsored by Miss Eleanor Martin and commissioned on 20 September 1918, Commander Robert C. Giffen in command.


Schley sailed from San Diego on 10 October 1918 for the east coast and, on 12 November, departed New York for the Mediterranean. On 24 January 1919 at Taranto, Italy, she embarked Rear Admiral Mark L. Bristol, Senior American Naval Officer in Turkey, and transported him to Constantinople. Schley next assumed duty in the Adriatic, acting as station ship at Pola, Italy, from 17 February to 15 April, and then visiting Italian and Yugoslav ports on the Adriatic until heading for the United States on 2 July. Schley returned to San Diego on 8 September 1919 and, except for trips to San Francisco for repairs, remained there until she was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 1 June 1922.

With Europe again at war and war threatening in the Pacific, Schley was recommissioned at San Diego on 3 October 1940. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 17 December for patrols and exercises there the next year. When Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, the destroyer was moored in a nest of ships undergoing overhaul and, as her guns were dismantled, was able to do little besides reply with small arms fire. Her overhaul was rushed to completion and, on 20 December, she took up a patrol station off the channel approaching Pearl Harbor. She operated there and off Honolulu for almost a year. On 13 December 1942, she departed Hawaiian waters for conversion into a fast transport at the Puget Sound Navy Yard. Schley was reclassified APD-14 effective 6 February 1943.

Schley returned to Pearl Harbor on 22 February and proceeded to the New Hebrides, arriving at Espiritu Santo on 24 March. In the South Pacific, she trained intensively with Marine raiders and other troops, acted as a patrol and escort vessel, and operated as a transport between the Solomons, the New Hebrides, American Samoa, and New Zealand.

Schley first participated in a landing under combat conditions on 30 June at New Georgia. With two other APD&rsquos and some smaller ships, she put troops ashore at Wickham Anchorage at the southwest end of Vangunu. On 5 July, she landed a second group of troops at Rice Anchorage, New Georgia. During this operation, a Japanese reinforcement group belatedly arrived on the scene and, in retiring, sank destroyer Strong (DD-467) with a long-range torpedo shot. After another trip to Rice Anchorage with supplies and ammunition, Schley sailed from Espiritu Santo on 1 August for overhaul at Mare Island.

Schley left the west coast for Pearl Harbor on 7 October, but engine repairs at Pearl Harbor took most of the rest of the year. On 30 December 1943, she arrived at San Diego to join the task force training for the invasion of the Marshall Islands. The force sailed from the west coast on 13 January 1944 and arrived off Kwajalein on 31 January. Schley landed her troops that day and then performed antisubmarine patrol duty until she reembarked her troops on 7 February.

She sailed for Eniwetok a week later. Her activities there showed the versatility of the small, fast transports. She arrived on 17 February and, that night, put her troops ashore on Bogon Island to prevent enemy infiltration from Engebi, which American troops had invaded earlier in the day. The next morning, she began seizing the remaining islands west of the main island of Eniwetok. That day, her troops captured five islands and helped to secure Engebi and Bogon.

On 24 February, after transferring her troops to other transports, she got underway for Kwajalein to escort two transports from that atoll to her new area of operations, New Guinea.

Schley arrived off New Guinea on 12 March and conducted convoy operations for the next month. On 22 April, she participated in the landings at Aitape, putting troops ashore and providing gunfire support. The next day at Tumleo Island, her boats landed troops from a larger transport while Schley again provided gunfire support. After repairs to a damaged propeller, Schley landed a company of troops on Niroemoar Island to set up a radar unit on 19 May. The next day, she rescued the crew of a wrecked American gasoline barge off Wakde Island and then sank two Japanese barges and silenced an enemy shore battery. The busy ship landed troops on Biak on 27 May and at Cape Sansapor at the western end of New Guinea on 30 July. She then proceeded to Australia for repairs.

Schley next participated in two important preliminaries for the reconquest of the Philippines. She landed troops on Morotai on 9 September, and, on 17 October, formed part of the APD group that occupied the small islands at the mouth of Leyte Gulf, clearing the way for the invasion of Leyte three days later.

After a month of convoy operations, Schley joined the task group which carried out landings in Ormoc Bay on 7 December. The group came under intense kamikaze attack but&mdashalthough her sister ship, Ward, was sunk&mdashSchley escaped damage. She then participated in the landings at Mindoro on 15 December 1944 and at Lingayen on 9 January 1945 and, during each operation, evaded an attacking kamikaze. At Mindoro, American planes shot down the suicide craft a scant thousand yards from Schley. At Lingayen, the kamikaze veered off at the last minute to attack another ship but missed. Schley remained on patrol off Lingayen until the 18th.

On 15 February, she landed troops at Mariveles Harbor in order to cut off Japanese escape routes during the assault on Manila Bay and, two days later, put troops ashore under enemy fire on Corregidor, climaxing and completing her operations in the Philippines.

Schley departed Manila Bay on the 19th and left the Philippines for Ulithi on 25 February. She then escorted convoys in the western Pacific, and was briefly at Okinawa with one from 26 to 28 April. On 29 May, Schley arrived at San Diego for repairs, and was redesignated DD-103 effective 5 July &ldquofor duty as rear-area escort and training vessel&rdquo as she was then too worn out for further front-line service. She was still under overhaul when the war ended, and after being made seaworthy, sailed on 17 September 1945 for inactivation at Philadelphia. Schley was decommissioned on 9 November 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 5 December 1945. Scrapping was completed by the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 29 March 1946.

Schley earned eleven battle stars on her Asiatic-Pacific campaign ribbon for participation in the following operations:


Military

Captain Artz, son of Peter (dod: 1834) and Anna, was among the most active enterprising of the business men of Hagerstown for fully half a century. He was also an active member of Trinity Lutheran Church. He received his title of captain from commanding a local company of militia. He also saw service under Captain George Shryock in the War of 1812 as his first lieutenant in the Ragan’s Regiment, Stansbury’s brigade.

In 1824, he served on a committee to prepare for Washington County welcoming and hosting General Layfayette in Hagerstown.

He was one of the original incorporators of the Mutual Insurance Company of Washington County on January 22, 1846.

He was buried from Trinity Church, where Revs. Lepley, Eyester, Hill and Luckenbach delivered the service and is interred at Rose Hill Cemetery in Washington County. He was 78 years old. His first wife, Catharine (Hammer) died on May 20, 1832 at the age of 41. He married Elizabeth (1790-1880). He fathered five children, Melinda, Cornelius, Samuel, George and Frederick.

George Bauernschmidt was born in Baltimore, the son of William and Marie Bauernschmidt. His grandfather was born in Germany and the Bauernschmidt family is known for their brewery. See Brewers.

RADM Bauernschmidt began his naval career in 1918 as a U.S. Naval Academy midshipman. After graduating in the line service in 1922, he was assigned to Pearl Harbor in the submarine service.

After he had served about 12 years, which included command of his submarine, the Navy began testing its officers for color blindness. Bauernschmidt promptly failed the test and the Bureau of Naval Personnel just as promptly informed him that his career was over. The rear admiral loved the Navy and appealed to his friend, RADM Nimitz for help. Nimitz, who was then serving as chief of Naval Personnel, offered him a transfer into the Supply Corps.

"World War II provided Bauernschmidt with some of the most vivid memories of his naval career. His most notable assignment, which lasted eight months, called for him to establish a Naval Supply Depot in Oran, Algeria, located on the shores of the Mediterranean in North Africa (about 500 miles from Casablanca). Much of his work force was composed of 300 Italian POWs. A humanitarian, Bauernschmidt provided the Italians with a full Navy ration (minus the ice cream), a policy which led his fellow officers to criticize him. He was later vindicated by the Geneva Convention, which supported his humane treatment of the POWs.

"Following the Algeria assignment, he was reassigned to London and was one of the most junior officers among those who planned the Normandy invasion. He was later wounded during a German bombing attack on London.

"After the war, he was assigned to Guam, where he consolidated various wayward depots into one command - the Guam Naval Supply Center.

"On the day after Christmas 1951, Bauernschmidt took command of Fleet and Industrial Supply Center, [then Naval Supply Center, Pearl Harbor . where] his 25 months of service were remembered . the plaza fronting Building 475 was named in his honor."

Baurnschmidt transferred to Naval Supply Depot Clearfield, Utah, in 1954 and retired the following year."

Other career assignments included USS Relief (AH 1) USS Nevada (BB 36) USS Beaver (AS 5) USS New York (BB 34) Navy Yard, Philadephia staff, commander, Destroyers, Pacific Fleet Naval Supply Depot, Mechanicsburg, Pa. and Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, Washington, D.C

His decorations include the Legion of Merit Victory Medal, World War I American Defense Service Medal with bronze "A" American Campaign Medal European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with one bronze star Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal Victory Medal, World War II National Defense Service Medal Korean Service Medal with one bronze star United Nations Service Medal and the Korean Presidential Unit Citation.

Rear Admiral Bauernschmidt is buried at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland.

Source. : CAPT Jeff Wagner, SC, USN, interviewed Bauernschmidt in 1995 and highlighted the admiral’s career as above. His date of birth and death is from the 1900 Maryland Census records, as well as his memorial headstone at the Naval Academy.

Daniel was the son of Melchoir Beltzhoover and wife Elizabeth, nee Schunk. Melchoir was born in Metternzimmern, Germany in 1752. He was the owner and proprietor of the Globe Tavern in Hagerstown, Maryland.

Daniel was an 1847 graduate of West Point. He served through the Mexican War. He resigned his commission in 1856. He began teaching at Mount St. Mary's College, eventually becoming the professor of Geometry. He joined the Confederacy during the Civil War and was made Captain of the famous 'Watson's Battery'. He then made Major and Lieutenant Colonel. After the war he returned to teaching. He had a love for music. Lt. Colonel Beltzhoover is buried in Saint Anthony Catholic Church Cemetery in Emmitsburg, Maryland.

We are 4th generation Baltimoreans living on the Southside of Baltimore, My great-grandfather, John Henry Bennaman, arrived to Baltimore from Prussia (Hannover, Germany) as a little boy and became a naturalized US citizen at age 8 in 1844. He went on to become a butcher at age 24, marrying and raising a family. His first born son, John Simpson Bennaman, was born in 1870, and was my grandfather.

John Simpson Bennaman married in 1899, and was a mariner sailing boats out of Baltimore's inner harbor. He fathered 5 children, one of which was my father, Howard Leroy Bennaman who was born in 1911. He died of pneumonia in 1917 leaving his wife a widow when my father was only 5, so my dad did not know him, or of his German lineage.

Howard L. Bennaman struggled for the next 5 years to get a 6th grade education, then leave school at age 13 working at ordinary jobs to provide for his widowed mother and get through the Great Depression era. World War II was a pivotal time in my dad's life. In 1943, at age 32, into the US Army and sent to France in 1944 to fight the German Army under Hitler. In November, 1944, his unit was bottling up German troops who were maintaining a UBOAT base on the west coast of France. He was captured while on combat patrol by Germans, but to his good fortune, was liberated 5 hours later. In January, 1945, General George Patton called up his 94th Infantry Division to fight the Germans at the Battle of the Bulge in the Saar-Mosselle River triangle region. They fought bitter battles in one of Europe's coldest winters, eventually successful crossing the Rhine River in Germany and occupying the town of Dusseldorf in the Spring of 1945. The war ended in May, 1945 and Patton sent my dad's army division to Czechloslovakia to provide military administration, establish order between fleeing German refugees, Russian troops bordering the region, and Czechloslovak citizens who were angry.

There my dad met and fell in love with his future wife, a 23 year old girl who lived on a farm near Breslau, Germany with her aging blacksmith dad. The two of them were displaced by the fighting around Breslau, and fled to Czechloslovakia. In 1946, my dad was honorably discharged stateside, and Hilda (Rodler) Bennaman moved to Bavaria, Germany. My dad asked the Red Cross to find her when he returned to the US, which they did in 1947. He paid her way to America, and they married, and I was born in 1948.

I have cousins in the Hannover region of Germany from my mother. And after research, I discovered that's where my dad's relatives came from.

My dad's proudest achievement was his service to his country. He was decorated with 4 battle stars serving under General Patton. He kept in contact with his infantry buddies after WWII, and served in the local VFW as a chaplain. In the George Bush administration, a Peace monument was erected at the battlefield in Sinz, Germany where my dad's Army division fought the 11th German Panzer Tank Division to honor both Germans and Americans and peace. It is frequently visited by members of both armies.

(Biographical Sketch provided by the great-grandson of John Henry Bennaman, Mel Bennaman)

Gunnery Sergeant who flew 23 missions during WWII in Europe. His plane was shot down over Austria and he was held prisoner in Stalag Luft IV until he was forced to walk in the ‘Black Death March’ ahead of the Russian advance. He was liberated in 1945. Thomas grew up in Hamilton and graduated from Calvert Hall and the University of Baltimore.

Sergeant Bittner is buried at Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery.

Mr. Blumenberg was born in the province of Brandenburg, Prussia. He was the son of Abraham and Sophia Blumenberg, and the twenty-first of a family of twenty-two children. Soon after his birth Blumenberg's parents moved to Frankfort-on the-Oder, and at an early age he was graduated from the gymnasium of that city. He served in the Prussian army in the Danish war of 1848, enlisting as a private and being promoted to the rank of first lieutenant. He was decorated for his services, but the anti-Semitism prevalent deprived him of his medal and, resenting such treatment, he left for America in 1854, settling in Baltimore, where he was engaged in mercantile pursuits until 1861.

When Fort Sumter was attacked Blumenberg assisted in organizing the fifth Maryland infantry regiment, of which he was commissioned major. His efforts for the Union cause won for him the hatred of the Secessionists, forcing him to be guarded constantly to prevent their attacking and hanging him. He first served near Hampton Roads, was later attached to Mansfield's corps in the peninsular campaign, and commanded his regiment as colonel at Antietam, where he was severely wounded in the thigh by a sharpshooter. This ultimately caused his death. He returned home, and was confined to his bed for several months.

President Lincoln appointed Blumenberg provost marshal of the third Maryland district, with headquarters at Baltimore. He held this office from 1863 to 1865, making himself very unpopular by a strict enforcement of the laws. President Johnson appointed him to a position in the revenue department, and commissioned him brigadier-general United States volunteers, by brevet. For a long time resident in Baltimore, he was extremely popular with the German and the Hebrew element of that city. He held the office of president of the National Schützen-Verein of America, and was an active member of Har Sinai congregation and of the Hebrew orphan asylum.

By : Cyrus Adler A. M. Friedenberg

Leon Dyer (some records show he was born Feist Emanuel Heim) was the son of John M. Dyer, the organizer and first president of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation. He was born in Alzey, Germany in 1807 and came to Baltimore with his family in 1812. His early days were spent working in his father’s meat packing business, which has been reported to be the first in America. It was while visiting New Orleans on behalf of his father’s business that he accepted the job of quartermaster for the State Militia. From this position he fought in the Mexican War, the Seminole War and the Texas battle for independence. He served in the Seminole War as a major under General Winfield Scott and also served under Scott during the Mexican War (1845-47). When back in Baltimore (1840-45), he was elected president of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation in 1840. He was very popular in Baltimore and was appointed acting mayor during the ‘bread riots’. He held a number of public offices.

He was also instrumental in 1848 of establishing one of the first congregations on the Pacific coast, in San Francisco.

He married Sarah 'Nachman' in 1852. They had four children.

He left Baltimore for health reasons and died in Louisville, Kentucky. He is buried in Galveston, Texas at the Hebrew Benevolent Society Cemetery. There are varied accounts of names, dates and locations with respect to this profile.

Born in Baltimore and raised in Mayfield, he was a McDonogh School graduate. He left his studies at Cornell University to enlist in the Army. He was assigned to an infantry unit fighting in Europe during World War II.

According to notes Mr. Goetze kept, he fought continuously from November 1944 through February 1945 in Belgium and Germany. As a 22-year-old private, he described a "hell before us" as he and his company attempted to cross the Siegfried Line while being shelled by German Panzer tanks in the Battle of the Bulge. When his superiors were killed in heavy fighting, he received a battlefield promotion to technical sergeant and platoon leader.

Mr. Goetze was hit by enemy fire and lost a finger while carrying ammunition bandoleers to his fellow soldiers.

Awarded the Purple Heart, he was also given the Bronze Star for "heroic service, courage and initiative in assisting in the capture of a German officer under fire."

Decades later, he was a founding member of the Military Order of the Purple Heart on the Eastern Shore. After the war, he returned to Cornell, earned a degree in mechanical engineering and joined his family's business, Albert F. Goetze Inc.

He spent most of his career in manufacturing and operations management at its Belair Road and Sinclair Lane plant, and oversaw equipment involved in ham, sausage, scrapple and frankfurter making. He became the firm's president and in 1968 was elected president of the Eastern Meat Packers Association.

Gov. Parris N. Glendening awarded him a citation in recognition of his dedication to the welfare of the bay and its tributaries.

He served on the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission and the Mid-Atlantic Regional Fishery Management Council, and was a founding member of the Maryland Chapter of the Coastal Conservation Association. He was also an organizer of the Talbot Rivers Protection Association.

Mr. Goetze is buried at Christ Church Episcopal Cemetery in St. Michael's.

Source: September 02, 2007|By Jacques Kelly | Sun reporter

2nd Lieutenant Michael Grosh was the son of John Grosh born in Germany and died in Frederick and Maria Gutenburg, born in Germany and died in Frederick. 2nd Lieutenant Michael Grosh died on or about October 4, 1777 at the battle of Germantown. He had five siblings, one sister, Catherine ran a tavern in Frederick and after her death in 1828 the tavern was renamed City Hotel. Another sister, Anna, married Elie Williams who served as the clerk of Washington County Court from 1795-1796 and later served on the Orphans Court.

Harry's first trip to Germany was during WWII. He was a genuine hero who was awarded the Bronze Star medal. When the German artillery had pinned down the Americans outside Wurzberg, Harry climbed a steep hill while under enemy fire and called down the positions of the enemy guns which were quickly silenced by American action.

Harry grew up on a farm in Parkton, MD, attended Sparks High School and Western Maryland College. He later attended Johns Hopkins University and received an accounting certificate. They were members of St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Rockdale where Harry served on the Church Council, Finance Committee and was an usher. Harry was an avid member of the University of Maryland football and basketballteams and attended many games of the Baltimore Orioles.

Mr. Gruel is buried at Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery.

The Baltimore Private - ironically of German descent - was dead. It was 10.59 and Henry Gunther is now recognized as the last soldier to be killed in action in WWI.”

Born in Baltimore of German descent, Henry was a United States Army World War I Soldier. He was the last American casualty of World War I. He was serving with Company A, 313th Infantry Regiment, 79th Division, as it was advancing toward Metz when it was announced that the Armistice would take effect at 11:00 a.m. on November 11. Despite this an attack was ordered, and as his unit was advancing they ran into a German ambush near the village of Chaumont-devant-Damvillers. Enraged at what appeared to be a German double-cross, he charged with his bayonet and was shot within a few yards of the German position. General Pershing officially recognized him as the last American death in his Order of the Day for November 11 announcing the Armistice. Gunther was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross and his body was returned home to Baltimore in 1923. His story is told in Joseph E. Persico's "Eleventh Month, Eleventh Day, Eleventh Hour." (bio by: Paul F. Wilson)

On November 11, 2010, a memorial service was held to honor Henry Gunther. The service was held at the Most Holy Redeemer Cemetery in Baltimore. It was a very moving tribute and a beautiful memorial stone was unveiled at his gravesite. Participants included many of the military service units in Maryland and many of the German clubs in the State.

William was the son of Johann Friedrich Carl Hadel and Margaretha Rebecca Seywert and brother of John Frederick Charles Hadel. He was born Wilhelm in Hamburg, Germany. He married Mary Elizabeth Roberts on July 19, 1855 in Baltimore. He emigrated in 1846. His military record indicates on March 03, 1847, he enlisted in Philadelphia in the US Army Captain Waddell's Company E 11th Regiment of infantry in the Mexican/American War Honorable discharge March 18, 1848 at New Orleans La. He also served during the Civil War as a 2 nd Lieutenant. During Civil War William was in Co. G, 5th Regiment of Maryland Volunteers.on 5 November 1861, honorably discharged 24 November 1862. He was pensioned by the U.S. Military. He worked as a clerk at the German Correspondent Newspaper and worked at the Bauernschmidt and Marrs Brewery. He and Mary Elizabeth had 8 children, William (1856) Margaret (1858) George (1861) Mary (1863) Florence (1866) Davidson Henry (1869) Ella (1873) and Clara (1876) [1880 Census Mt. Winans].

Some of the information provided in this profile provided by the Great grandson of William Hadel, Mr. Robert Daly

Richard Curzon Hoffman fought in the civil war, his allegiance to the South. He went to Richmond in April 1861 and mustered into the Confederate Army. At the rank of Lieutenant in Company B, he, on May 25 mustered with the Twenty-First Virginia Volunteer Infantry, ‘Stonewall Jackson’s Second Brigade’. He advanced to Captain and was with General Robert E. Lee at the time of the surrender at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865.

After the war, he returned to Baltimore and began a partnership with D. Bowley Thompson, under the name of Hoffman, Thompson & Company. They were iron merchants. At the death of his partner, he continued the business under the name of R.C. Hoffman & Company.

(See also Manufacturing & Retail)

George Kaufman was born in Germany to John G. Kaufman, a farmer and Lena (Kessler). John died in 1854 at the age of 45 and Lena, with her four sons and one daughter left via LeHarve and emigrated to the United States and arrived in New York, after a thirty nine day voyage in 1860.

George grew up on a farm in his native village and obtained a public school education. After emigrating, George remained in New York for one year and then in an effort to help preserve his adopted county, enlisted in Battery K, First New York Light Artillery and in September of 1861 went to Baltimore. He remained in Washington for another year and then under General Banks, went to meet Jackson and participated in a number of hard-fought engagements, including the battle of Cedar Mountain, second battle of Bull Run, Antietam, Gettysburg and Mine Run. After a winter at Culpeper Court House, Va., he was attached to the Fifth Army Corps, and under General Grant took part in the battle of the Wilderness. In 1864 Mr. Kaufman was given veteran status, however, he remained in the service until hostilities ceased. He was mustered out June 20, 1865. He had two horses shot from under him, and his long and arduous service broke down his health, so that for some time after the close of the war he was confined in a hospital in Baltimore.

He liked Baltimore and decided to remain here. He served an apprenticeship as a stone cutter John Calvert, and worked in that trade until 1874. He was then appointed foreman on government works at Richmond, Va. He continued in this business until his retirement in 1888.

He was very successful and owned a good amount of property. He married Jennie Bien, also a native of Germany in 1873. On the 1900 census, he is listed living with his wife and his grandson, Harry Paul. They lived at 2213 Wilkens Avenue. The 1880 census shows the daughter Kate at 12 (est. 1868).

He was a Republican and a nominee for the general assembly, third district-eighteenth ward, in 1895. He was successful and was a prominent member in the session of 1896. He chaired the committee on labor, and was a member of the committees on public buildings, inspections and bills. In January, 1897, he was appointed by the supreme bench as bailiff of circuit court No. 2. He was a leading member of the Thomas B. Reed Republican Club of the eighteenth ward, belonged to the German Reformed Church, was a member of the Masonic Order, the Knights of Pythias and the Red Men.

Mr. Klein was the son of Robert and Maybelle Klein of New York. It appears that his grandmother and great grandfather were German born (1930 census). He graduated from Far Rockaway High School in New York. Robert C. Klein was a WWII veteran and ‘Bronze Star’ honoree, who participated in the liberation of Landsberg concentration camp (Bavaria 4-27-1945). He served as a staff sergeant serving the 101 st Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron of the 12 th Armored Division. Mr. Klein was awarded the Bronze Star for heroism when he helped rescue many of the men in his platoon who had been injured and carried them to safety. His obituary in the Baltimore Sun states that Mr. Klein didn’t speak much of his service because of the atrocities he witnessed and the emotional toll it took on him. It wasn’t until he was asked to share the experience on a video for Yale University documenting Holocaust Testimonies (2003).

He met his wife, Bernice Bernheimer in 1943 at a USO dance at Fort Meade, Maryland. They married and parented two daughters. He earned his BA degree in 1948 at New York University. He then moved to Baltimore where he took a job at Riggs, Counselman, Micheals and Downes, Inc., an insurance agency now located in Baltimore County. At his retirement in 1982, he was their senior vice president.

Mr. Klein enjoyed trout fishing and was an avid baseball fan. He was a member of the German Society of Maryland. He was Catholic and a member of Immaculate Conception in Towson.

Henry Lightner was 16 and was the drummer boy at Fort McHenry on September 11, 1814. He sounded the alarm by beating his drum throughout the night. On his death he was buried on a grassy plot in Baltimore Cemetery , without a marker. The Veteran's Administration at the request of his descendants provided a headstone with his rank, service in the Maryland Militia and the dates of his birth and death. His descendants added a footstone engraved 'Drummer boy of Fort McHenry'. Henry survived and fathered 12 children. The drum remained in his family until a descendant, in 1961, donated it to the Flag House. His father was a drummer boy during the Revolutionary War. Henry was from a German family and was a member of Zion Church .

The city of Baltimore has since issued a proclamation that designated Oct. 13, 2012 as Henry Lightner Day. The drum he played is on display at the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House in Baltimore. And it was used by his father while serving under General George Washington at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania during the American Revolution some years earlier.

Brantz Mayer served during the Civil War, Mayer served as a brigadier-general with the Maryland volunteers and he

assisted in recruiting for the state. In 1863, he received the post of additional paymaster. In January 1865, he was promoted to major and paymaster in the United States regular army. In 1866, he was promoted again, this time to lieutenant-colonel (retroactive to November 1865) for his service during the war. Mayer retired from the pay department in 1875 at the rank of colonel. (See also Law & Politics).

Prominent and active citizen. General Miltenberger held a commission in the war of 1812. He held various positions of public trust and honor .

Col. Prechtel was born in Bavaria, and died in Baltimore. He served in the Civil War on the Union side, reaching the rank of Colonel and later continuing in the service out West. For a time he lived with his sister, near Manchester, in Carroll County where he taught school for many years. While on a trip to Germany, his sister died. A fire destroyed his house and he was severely burned. His manuscripts and papers were destroyed in this fire as well. After he recovered, he moved to Baltimore City, where he was interested in the work of the Historical Society. He was President of the Society at the time of his death. He was also the treasurer of the J.F. Wiessner Orphans’ Home. He was prominent in the Grand Army of the Republic.

Captain Rau was born in Gravinstein, Hesse-Cassel, Germany. He is the son of John C. Rau, a blacksmith by trade. He was a soldier in the Franco-German war and was in the regular army of Germany for over twenty years. He was an active participant in the war of 1812. The older John Rau died in 1833.

He had four siblings, three brothers and one sister. His brother George came to the US and became a merchant tailor. His brother Henry was also in business in Baltimore.

John’s father died when he was only six years old and until the age of fifteen, he attended the village school. He began to learn the wheelwright trade with his brother William. In 1848, he joined the German army as a member of the cavalry. He was in the service for five years. He came to the US in 1852 and came directly to Baltimore. He began to work his trade and located near the Belair Market. He extended his business to the restaurant business where he continued until 1867. He was a large property owner and owned several businesses. In 1867, he sold his property and began his wheelwright business and a general blacksmith business. He again invested in real estate. He conducted his business at the corner of First Street and Eastern Avenue. He owned many residential and business properties.

He was a member of the State militia for over twenty years and organized a cavalry company where he was the Captain for over sixteen years. He married Wilhelmina Schluderberg (1831-1923), also a native of Germany, in March of 1854. Together they had five children.

Captain Rau was a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity, an organizer of the Order of Red Men, a member of the Legion of Red Cross. The family belonged to the German Lutheran Reformed Church of Canton. He is buried at Mt. Carmel Cemetery in Baltimore.

The family settled on the Western Shore of Maryland in 1650. The first to live in Maryland was Elias Ritter. He was a native of Bedingen, Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany where he had a large estate. He was forced into exile for supplying Protestants with munitions during the ‘Thirty Years War’. He went to England and while there joined one of the expeditions to Maryland. The family in Frederick County located on the banks of the Monocacy River. The family members were Elias, John, William, Tobias, Michael and Ludwig. John, the son of Elias assisted William Penn in surveying the province of Pennsylvania in 1682. For this, he received five thousand acres of land. William and Elias Ritter were members of Captain William Keeport’s company, Stricker’s battalion, Maryland line of 1776. Ludwig Ritter was born October 20, 1778 in Frederick. Jacob Ritter was born on November 20, 1804 near Fayetteville, Pennsylvania. He remained in Pennsylvania until August 1847 when he moved to Finksburg in Carroll County, Maryland. He died in Eldersburg in 1870.

Clifton Roehle, son of Charles F. Roehle (see medicine) was born in Baltimore and attended public schools and St. John’s College. In 1893, he entered the Naval Academy. He was the youngest member of his class, yet completed his studies and ranked first in academics in three years. At the close of his last year he was assigned to make the summer cruise on the practice steamer ‘Bancroft’. After the four weeks and when docking in Philadelphia, he was suffering with typhoid fever and died on July 14, 1896. There is a scholarship at St. John’s in his honor. The class of 1897 erected in Loudon Park, a monument as a memorial to their comrade. The emblem of the U.S. Navy adorns the cap of the stone.

Mr. Schley was born in Frederick. He was a Naval Academy graduate (1860) and assigned to the frigate ‘Niagara’. In 1861 he was made master and sent to the store-ship ‘Potomac’. He served in the West Gulf blockading squadron and fought a field battery on the Mississippi River, at which time he was made lieutenant. In 1866, he was made lieutenant commander, and for three years was an instructor in languages at the Naval Academy. He was then moved to the China station and led the assault against the forts on the Sulee river. In 1873 to 76 he was again on the faculty at the Naval Academy. He was promoted to commander in 1877, commanding the ‘Essex’.

His most notable achievement, however, was his search for Greely and his exploring team in the Arctic region [1] . In 1881, Greely with twenty five men sailed from St. Johns, Newfoundland, and disappeared. In 1884, after two unsuccessful attempts by others, Schley volunteered to make an attempt and on 1884, he sailed from St. Johns. He found seven survivors and brought them home, along with nine bodies of those that had perished. He received many accolades from many state governments and the land near which the rescue had been made was named Schleyland.

At the outbreak of the Spanish-American War, Comodore Schley was ordered to the ‘Brooklyn’ as commander of the Flying Squadron. He was promoted to rear-admiral at the close of the war.

USS Schley (DD-103) was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War I and later designated, APD-14 in the World War II. She was the first ship named in honor of Winfield Scott Schley. Schley was laid down on 29 October 1917 by Union Iron Works, San Francisco, California launched on 28 March 1918 sponsored by Miss Eleanor Martin and commissioned on 20 September 1918, Commander Robert C. Giffen in command.

In 1885, he wrote, ‘The Rescue of Greely’. He is interred in Washington DC.

Commander of the first landing boat to touch the Normandy beach on June 5, 1944. Schroeder came from Baltimore and is of German-American stock. (According to the News American 6-7-1944 and quoted by Michael Olesker in the Baltimore Sun during the 50 th Anniversary of D-Day.He commanded Company F of the 2nd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division in the Normandy Landings on June 6, 1944, landing on Utah beach in France. Leading the men of his company, Schroeder was the first American soldier to come ashore from a landing craft in the D-Day invasion.Schroeder was born in the Baltimore suburb of Linthicum Heights, Maryland, on July 16, 1918, graduating in 1937 from nearby Glen Burnie High School where he played soccer and baseball. While captain of his high school's soccer team in 1936, they won the Maryland state championship. He then attended the University of Maryland, College Park, on a full athletic scholarship. While there, he was enrolled in the Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC). In June, 1941, Schroeder graduated from the University of Maryland and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the U. S. Army at the age of 22.[2] In December, 1941, he married the former Margaret Nicholson, whom he had met while in high school. The couple's first child, a son, was born the following year. They would later have two more children (a daughter and another son).

George Stricker was born in Frederick Maryland in 1732. His parents were Swiss and settled in North Carolina before coming to Maryland. He served as an officer in the French and Indian War in 1755 and took part in the defense of Western Maryland against the Indians. He was commissioned as a Captain January 14, 1776 and was stationed near Annapolis for several months. When the German Regiment was organized, he was appointed Lieutenant Colonel on July 17, 1776 and was its highest ranking officer. He was a member of the German Reformed church in Frederick. He fought with the German Battalion in battles around New York City and New Jersey. He became the field commander when Colonel Haussegger was taken prisoner by the Hessians in Trenton. He led the Battalion at the Battle of Princeton on January 3, 1777. His oldest son was General John Stricker.

John Stricker was born in Frederick, Maryland. He was the son of Colonel George Stricker. He was appointed a cadet in the German Battalion at the onset of the Revolutionary War. He served in Captain Graybill’s company at the Battles of Long Island, Harlem Heights, White Plains, For Washington, Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown and Monmouth. He was commissioned 2 nd Lieutenant after the Battle of Trenton and put in charge of the Hessian prisoners. He was transferred to the 2 nd Pennsylvania Regiment and later the 3 rd Pennsylvania Regiment.

After the war, John Stricker was a Baltimore businessman. He organized a company of Baltimore Militia and in 1794 assisted in the suppression of the Whiskey Rebellion in Pennsylvania. During the War of 1812, then General, he became the commanding field officer of the Maryland Militia for the defense of Baltimore. He was in command of the American forces at the Battle of North Point on September 10-12, 1814.

He was later a member of the Baltimore City Council. Stricker Street in Baltimore is named in his honor. He assisted in reorganizing the German Society of Maryland in 1817 and served as a vice president until his death. He was an original member of the Society of the Cincinnati, formed by officers of the Continental Army. He died in Baltimore.

One of the leading members of St. John's church for many years , George, son of John (1747-1831) and Mary (Teagarden 1747-1816) Shryock, was born in 1783 on the manor in Washington County. In 1787 the family removed to Hagerstown, and resided on Franklin Street opposite the Oak Spring. In 1796 he accompanied his father and brother John to Westmoreland County, Pa., where they built a log house in the woods. In 1803, George Shryock returned to Hagerstown and began to manufacture pumps. He was a leading member of St. John’s congregation, which his father had furnished with a portion of the building materials for the church edifice erected in 1796. In 1808 he married Elizabeth Lewis (1784-1865), daughter of Capt. William Lewis, both he and his wife became communicants of St. John's Church. Together they were the parents of Anna, John, William and Priscilla.

In 1820 he was a lay delegate to the first General Synod of the Lutheran Church in America, which met in Hagerstown, and was the last survivor of that body. In 1813 he served as captain in Ragan's regiment, Stansbury's brigade. His regiment was present at the famous bombardment on the night the "Star-Spangled Banner” was written.

Note : Initial information about Captain Shryock's wife Elizabeth was obtained through Scharf's History of Western Maryland (1882) and was later corrected by Kitty Shryock Hood, who corrected the name of Elizabeth's father. The Maryland Herald and Elizabeth Town Advertiser, on January 15, 1808 wrote 'Married Tuesday eve last, by Rev. Rahauser, George Shryock to Miss Betsey Lewis, daughter of Capt. William Lewis, of this town.' In addition, a deposition dated May 21, 1839 Hagerstown, in the pension file of William Lewis, George Shryock states that he is married to Elizabeth Lewis, the oldest daughter of William and Mary Lewis, and that he believes she was born in 1784.

Captain Shryock was laid to rest at Rose Hill Cemetery in Hagerstown.

He served four years as the first lieutenant in the Maryland National Guard and took part in the railroad riots of 1877. Governor Lloyd Lowndes appointed him chief of staff with the rank of brigadier-general. (See also Government, Law & Politics )

Served as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Maryland for 32 years, the longest ever served by any Grand Master in the United States. Had been elected to his 33rd term when he died.

He was in the lumber business, and held many public offices, including Police Commissioner of Baltimore and State Treasurer of Maryland. Was president of the Iron Mountain and Greenbrier Railroad. Was a director of bank, power, and telephone companies. He was first president of the George Washington National Masonic Memorial treasurer of Supreme Council, 33° AASR (SJ) and Sovereign Grand Inspector General in Md. Grand Treasurer of the General Grand Chapter, R.A.M. was Past Grand High Priest of Grand Chapter, Past Grand Master of the Grand Council, and Past Grand Commander of the Grand Commandery in Maryland.

He was married to Maria E. H. (1850-1886). They are buried at Lorraine Park Cemetery .

Capt Shutt was born in Baltimore to Col. Augustus P. Shutt and Mary (Miller). Both of his parents were born in Baltimore to German immigrants who came to the US at the beginning of the 1800s. His parents were married on September 30, 1838, His father was in the furniture manufacturing business and had a plant on Gay Street in 1840. He was an exporter of that furniture around the world. He continued that business until 1845 when he was appointed High Constable of the City of Baltimore (this is now the Police Chief). He held this position until 1853 when he was appointed Warden of the Baltimore City Jail. He also worked as a conductor for passenger trains for the B&O. He was an independent candidate running against the very popular Thomas Swann for Mayor of Baltimore. Thomas Swann won the election.

The Colonel’s route on the B&O was through a portion of Virginia and during the time of the Civil War, the track was frequently torn up by Confederates and the trains were often held up by Mosby’s men. The Colonel’s train was robbed one night and the train thrown from the tracks by Mosby’s men. The engineer was killed and the US Paymaster robbed. The Colonel was well respected, however, and was even chosen, at the request of the Secretary of War Stanton, to take him to his sick mother’s bedside. The Colonel and the Secretary remained good friends unril Stanton died in 1857. During his time with the B&O he also conducted a train that was filled with military being sent in May 1857 to suppress a freight conductors strike. His train was thrown from the track by strikers at Mt. Clare station. He was presented with a gold medal for his courage and conduct during that ordeal.

He was also involved in the John Brown raid at Harper’s Ferry in 1859. It began when an agent of the railroad, Beckman, was killed by Brown’s men. Shutt was appointed temporary agent of the company there. He participated in the taking down of Brown and his men. He even captured Brown’s rifle and took it home with him.

When the Civil War broke out and the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment was passing through Baltimore to Washington on April 19, 1861, it was attacked by a mob. Colonel Shutt was selected to take them via train to Washington.

Colonel Shutt took great interest in the military and was commissioned from time to time until he rose to the rank of Colonel and the commanding officer of the Fifth Regiment. His commissions

5-30-1856: commissioned third lieutenant Independent Greys, Fifty-third Regiment

12-27-185: commissioned second lieutenant same company

4-26-1847: commissioned captain Independent Blues, Fifth Regiment, Maryland Volunteer Infantry

10-10-1853: commissioned major Fifth Maryland Volunteer Infantry

3-22-1856: commissioned lieutenant colonel, Fifth Maryland Volunteer Infantry.

3-12-1861: commissioned colonel of this distinguished regiment and remained its colonel and commanding officer until it was disbanded at the beginning of the war.

The Colonel, after resigning his position with the B&O, moved to Martinsburg, W. VA. He took charge of the B&O Dining Hotel, where he remained until 1877. He also was elected Mayor three terms while in Martinsburg. He then returned to Baltimore.

Upon his return to Baltimore he went into the coal and wood business, taking with him his son, Captain Shutt, under the firm name of A. P. Shutt & Son their business grew and the firm soon became one of the foremost in their line in the city Colonel Shutt continued in this business until his death, July 10, 1881. The Colonel and his wife had eight children.

His son Captain Shutt succeeded him and kept the firms name. He was educated in the public schools of Baltimore and Loyola College. His education was interrupted during the Sixth Massachusetts Regiment riots mentioned above. He was a member of Company E, Fifth Regiment. He quit school after this and worked as a clerk with Lord & Robinson, woodcrafters, where he remained until the family moved to Martinsburg. He worked there with his father in the hotel business and returned to Baltimore with the family and began work with the family coal business, A.P. Shutt & Son.

Captain Shutt was married to Hilda Shutt (born in Germany 4-1855). There were two step children listed on the 1910 census, Lillie Laubheimer (30) and Lena Laubheimer (25). In 1910 the family lived at 1408 Mt. Royal Avenue. They were Protestants. He was a member of the Fifth Regiment, Veteran Corpos, L.M.N.G. He was captain and quartermaster of that command. The family lives on W. Lexington Street. The business was located at 106 N. Eutaw Street.

World War II B-17 Pilot, Who Flew 51 Missions and Won A Distinguished Flying Cross Martin Herman Stephan, a decorated World War II pilot who flew 51 missions and was a retired engineer. Born in a suburb of Leipzig, Bohlitz-Ehrenburg, Germany, he immigrated to Baltimore in 1924 with his mother and sister. He grew up on Palermo Avenue and graduated from Polytechnic Institute in 1942.

Source: August 14, 2009, By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun.

John was born in the Holstein region of Northern Germany. He enlisted in the service in the US Army in Baltimore on December 1, 1863. He was a member of Company C, 1 st Maryland Infantry. He served as a Corporal. He earned the Medal of Honor during the Civil War for heroism displayed on February 6, 1865 at Hatcher’s Run, Virginia. As a color bearer, Corporal Thompson distinguished himself by preceding his regiment in the assault, bravely carrying the flag. He planted his regiment’s flag in advance of his men. He mustered out on July 2, 1865 at Arlington Heights, VA.

He married Augusta (1842-1911).

Mr. Thompson is buried at Immanuel Cemetery in Baltimore.

John was the son of Henry (immigrated from Germany to the U.S. when eighteen). He was an officer in the Confederate army during the four years of the Civil War. He was the commanding officer of the Second Maryland Regiment, Confederate States army, the part of the Army of Northern Virginia, which General Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox Court House in 1865.

He was married to Mary (Sutton) and they are buried at Loudon Park Cemetery .

"Wouldn't it be wonderful if the Medal of Honor didn't exist because there were no wars and we could all live in peace? And that the only way to spell war was love? Wouldn't that be wonderful?" —Paul J. Wiedorfer

Paul J. Wiedorfer is a retired United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in World War II.

Born in Baltimore, Maryland and raised in the 2400 block of McElderry Street, he attended St. Andrew's School, and graduated in 1940 from Baltimore Polytechnic Institute. On 11November 2008 a plaque honoring him was place in Poly's Memorial Hall. Married to his bride, Alice Stauffer, for just six months when Wiedorfer enlisted in the U.S. Army in 1943, he was working as an apprentice power station operator at the Baltimore Gas & Electric Company in Baltimore, and was living in the 1900 block of Bank Street. Wiedorfer did his basic training at Camp Lee, Virginia. He was then assigned to the Quartermaster Corps, and then he took and passed the examination for cadet air training, and was training to be a pilot, but the army switched him to infantry because of greater need. On the way to England he crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the Queen Mary, and by December 25, 1944 was serving as a private in Company G, 318th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division. On that Christmas Day, near Chaumont, Belgium, Wiedorfer single-handedly charged across 150 yards of open ground and then destroyed two German machine gun emplacements. He was subsequently promoted to Staff Sergeant and, on June 12, 1945, issued the Medal of Honor for his actions during the battle. While crossing the Saar River, he was severely injured February 10, 1945 by a mortar shell that blew up near him, shrapnel broke his left leg, ripped into his stomach, and seriously injured two fingers on his right hand. The sergeant next to him was killed instantly. He was evacuated to the 137th United States Army General Hospital in England where he was placed in traction. While in the hospital a sergeant reading Stars and Stripes asked him how he spelled his name, and then told him he had won the Medal of Honor. Later, on May 5, 1945, General E.F. Koenig with a band entered the ward to present him with his medal. In addition to the Medal of Honor he also has a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart. He returned to Baltimore June 11, 1945, and was given a ticker tape parade with General George C. Marshall and Maryland governor Herbert R. O'Conor in attendance. After the war he spent another three years recovering in different army hospitals and then returned to Baltimore Gas & Electric, and retired in 1981, after 40 years of service. He and Alice had four children.

Medal of Honor citation He alone made it possible for his company to advance until its objective was seized. Company G had cleared a wooded area of snipers , and 1 platoon was advancing across an open clearing toward another wood when it was met by heavy machinegun fire from 2 German positions dug in at the edge of the second wood. These positions were flanked by enemy riflemen. The platoon took cover behind a small ridge approximately 40 yards from the enemy position. There was no other available protection and the entire platoon was pinned down by the German fire. It was about noon and the day was clear, but the terrain extremely difficult due to a 3-inch snowfall the night before over ice-covered ground. Pvt. Wiedorfer, realizing that the platoon advance could not continue until the 2 enemy machinegun nests were destroyed, voluntarily charged alone across the slippery open ground with no protecting cover of any kind. Running in a crouched position, under a hail of enemy fire, he slipped and fell in the snow, but quickly rose and continued forward with the enemy concentrating automatic and small-arms fire on him as he advanced. Miraculously escaping injury, Pvt. Wiedorfer reached a point some 10 yards from the first machinegun emplacement and hurled a handgrenade into it. With his rifle he killed the remaining Germans, and, without hesitation, wheeled to the right and attacked the second emplacement. One of the enemy was wounded by his fire and the other 6 immediately surrendered. This heroic action by 1 man enabled the platoon to advance from behind its protecting ridge and continue successfully to reach its objective. A few minutes later, when both the platoon leader and the platoon sergeant were wounded, Pvt. Wiedorfer assumed command of the platoon, leading it forward with inspired energy until the mission was accomplished.


Contents

World War I

Schley sailed from San Diego on 10 October 1918 for the east coast and, on 12 November, departed New York for the Mediterranean. On 24 January 1919 at Taranto, Italy, she embarked Rear Admiral Mark L. Bristol, Senior American Naval Officer in Turkey, and transported him to Constantinople. Schley next assumed duty in the Adriatic, acting as station ship at Pola, Italy, from 17 February to 15 April, and then visiting Italian and Yugoslav ports on the Adriatic until heading for the United States on 2 July. Schley returned to San Diego on 8 September 1919 and, except for trips to San Francisco for repairs, remained there until she was placed out of commission, in reserve, on 1 June 1922.

World War II

With Europe again at war and war threatening in the Pacific, Schley was recommissioned at San Diego on 3 October 1940. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 17 December for patrols and exercises there the next year. When Japanese planes attacked Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, the destroyer was moored in a nest of ships undergoing overhaul and, as her guns were dismantled, was able to do little besides reply with small arms fire. Her overhaul was rushed to completion and, on 20 December, she took up a patrol station off the channel approaching Pearl Harbor. She operated there and off Honolulu for almost a year. On 13 December 1942, she departed Hawaiian waters for conversion into a fast transport at the Puget Sound Navy Yard. Schley was reclassified APD-14 effective 6 February 1943.

Schley returned to Pearl Harbor on 22 February and proceeded to the New Hebrides, arriving at Espiritu Santo on 24 March. In the South Pacific, she trained intensively with Marine raiders and other troops, acted as a patrol and escort vessel, and operated as a transport between the Solomons, the New Hebrides, American Samoa, and New Zealand.

Schley first participated in a landing under combat conditions on 30 June at New Georgia. With two other APD's and some smaller ships, she put troops ashore at Wickham Anchorage at the southwest end of Vangunu. On 5 July, she landed a second group of troops at Rice Anchorage, New Georgia. During this operation, a Japanese reinforcement group belatedly arrived on the scene and, in retiring, sank Strong with a long-range torpedo shot. After another trip to Rice Anchorage with supplies and ammunition, Schley sailed from Espiritu Santo on 1 August for overhaul at Mare Island.

Schley left the west coast for Pearl Harbor on 7 October, but engine repairs at Pearl Harbor took most of the rest of the year. On 30 December 1943, she arrived at San Diego to join the task force training for the invasion of the Marshall Islands. The force sailed from the west coast on 13 January 1944 and arrived off Kwajalein on 31 January. Schley landed her troops that day and then performed antisubmarine patrol duty until she reembarked her troops on 7 February.

She sailed for Eniwetok a week later. Her activities there showed the versatility of the small, fast transports. She arrived on 17 February and, that night, put her troops ashore on Bpgon Island to prevent enemy infiltration from Engebi, which American troops had invaded earlier in the day. The next morning, she began seizing the remaining islands west of the main island of Eniwetok. That day, her troops captured five islands and helped to secure Engebi and Bogon.

On 24 February, after transferring her troops to other transports, she got underway for Kwajalein to escort two transports from that atoll to her new area of operations, New Guinea.

Schley arrived off New Guinea on 12 March and conducted convoy operations for the next month. On 22 April, she participated in the landings at Aitape, putting troops ashore and providing gunfire support. The next day at Tumleo Island, her boats landed troops from a larger transport while Schley again provided gunfire support. After repairs to a damaged propeller, Schley landed a company of troops on Niroemoar Island to set up a radar unit on 19 May. The next day, she rescued the crew of a wrecked American gasoline barge off Wakde Island and then sank two Japanese barges and silenced an enemy shore battery. The busy ship landed troops on Biak on 27 May and at Cape Sansapor at the western end of New Guinea on 30 July. She then proceeded to Australia for repairs.

Schley next participated in two important preliminaries for the reconquest of the Philippines. She landed troops on Morotai on 9 September, and, on 17 October, formed part of the APD group that occupied the small islands at the mouth of Leyte Gulf, clearing the way for the invasion of Leyte three days later.

After a month of convoy operations, Schley joined the task group which carried out landings in Ormoc Bay on 7 December. The group came under intense kamikaze attack although her sister ship, Ward, was sunk, Schley escaped damage. She then participated in the landings at Mindoro on 15 December 1944 and at Lingayen on 9 January 1945 and, during each operation, evaded an attacking kamikaze. At Mindoro, American planes shot down the kamikaze a scant thousand yards from Schley. At Lingayen, the kamikaze veered off at the last minute to attack another ship but missed. Schley remained on patrol off Lingayen until the 18th.

1945-1946

On 15 February, she landed troops at Mariveles Harbor in order to cut off Japanese escape routes during the assault on Manila Bay and, two days later, put troops ashore under enemy fire on Corregidor, climaxing and completing her operations in the Philippines.

Schley departed Manila Bay on the 19th and left the Philippines for Ulithi on 25 February. She then escorted convoys in the western Pacific, and was briefly at Okinawa with one from 26 April to 28 April. On 29 May, Schley arrived at San Diego for repairs, and was redesignated DD-103 effective 5 July "for duty as rear-area escort and training vessel", as she was then too worn out for further front-line service. She was still under overhaul when the war ended, and after being made seaworthy, sailed on 17 September 1945 for inactivation at Philadelphia. Schley was decommissioned on 9 November 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 5 December 1945. Scrapping was completed by the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 29 March 1946.


USS Schley DD-103 (1918-1945)

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The Ships of Pearl Harbor: A Comprehensive List with Short Histories of Each Ship

Last year I wrote a piece called The Battleships of Pearl Harbor. I followed that with an article this year entitled “Forgotten on the Far Side of Ford Island: The USS Utah, USS Raleigh, USS Detroit and USS Tangier. Of course most anyone that has see either Tora! Tora! Tora! Or Pearl Harbor is acquainted with the attack on “Battleship Row” and the airfields on Oahu. What are often overlooked in many accounts are the stories of some of the lesser known ships that played key roles or were damaged in the attack. Since none of the articles that I have seen have discussed all of the U.S. Navy ships at Pearl Harbor on that fateful morning I have taken the time to list all the ships with the exception of yard and patrol craft present at Pearl Harbor on December 7 th 1941. I have also excluded Coast Guard cutters. A brief account of each ship’s war service and final disposition is included. I believe that this is the only site that has this information in a single article.

During the attack 18 ships were sunk or damaged but only three, Arizona, Oklahoma and Utah never returned to service. During the war a further 18 ships were sunk or written off as losses during the war. All ships lost in the war are marked with an asterisk. One ship, the USS Castorremained in active service until 1968 serving in the Korean and Vietnam Wars. One ship, the Light Cruiser Phoenixwas sunk in the Falklands War while serving as the Argentine ship General Belgrano. No U.S. Navy ships apart from the Yard Tug Hoga(not included in this article) remain today. It is unfortunate that the Navy or any organization had the foresight to save one of these ships. It would have been fitting for one of the battleships that survived the war to be preserved as a memorial ship near the Arizona Memorial. While the USS Missouri serves this purpose symbolic of the end of the war it is a pity that no ship at Pearl Harbor was preserved so that people could see for themselves what these gallant ships was like.

Battleships

Nevada (BB-36) Nevadawas the only Battleship to get underway during the attack. As she attempted to escape the harbor she was heavily damaged and to prevent her sinking in the main channel she was beached off Hospital Point. She would be raised and returned to service by the May 1943 assault on Attu. She would then return to the Atlantic where she would take part in the Normandy landings off Utah Beach and the invasion of southern France in July 1944. She then returned to the Pacific and took part in the operations against Iwo Jima and Okinawa where she again provided naval gunfire support. Following the war she would be assigned as a target at the Bikini atoll atomic bomb tests, surviving these she would be sunk as a target on 31 July 1948. She received 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

*Oklahoma (BB-37)During the Pearl Harbor attack Oklahoma was struck by 5 aerial torpedoes capsized and sank at her mooring with the loss of 415 officers and crew. Her hulk would be raised but she would never again see service and sank on the way to the breakers in 1946. She was awarded one battle star for her service during the attack.

Pennsylvania (BB-38) Pennsylvania was the Pacific Fleet Flagship on December 7 th 1941 and was in dry dock undergoing maintenance at the time of the attack. Struck by two bombs she received minor damage and would be in action in early 1942. She underwent minor refits and took part in many amphibious landings in the Pacific and was present at the Battle of Surigo Strait. Heavily damaged by an aerial torpedo at Okinawa Pennsylvania would be repaired and following the war used as a target for the atomic bomb tests. She was sunk as a gunnery target in 1948. She received 8 battle stars for her WWII service.

*Arizona (BB-39) Arizona was destroyed during the attack. Hit by 8 armor piercing bombs one of which penetrated her forward black powder magazine she was consumed in a cataclysmic explosion which killed 1103 of her 1400 member crew. She was decommissioned as a war loss but her colors are raised and lowered every day over the Memorial which sits astride her broken hull. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Tennessee (BB-43) Tennesseewas damaged by two bombs and was shield from torpedo hits by West Virginia.After repairs she conducted operations in the Pacific until she reported to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in August 1942 for a complete rebuild and modernized with the latest in radar, fire control equipment and anti-aircraft armaments. She returned to active service in May 1943. She provided Naval Gunfire support in numerous amphibious operations and was a key ship during the Battle of Surigo Strait firing in six-gun salvos to make careful use of her limited supply of armor-piercing projectiles, Tennessee got off 69 of her big 14-inch bullets before checking fire. Her gunfire helped sink the Japanese Battleships Fuso and Yamishiro and other ships of Admiral Nishimura’s Southern Force. She was damaged by a Kamikaze off Okinawa on 18 April 1945 which killed 22 and wounded 107 of her crew but did not put her out of action. Her final assignment of the war was to cover the landing of occupation troops at Wakayama, Japan. She was decommissioned in 1947 and remained in reserve until 1959 when she was sold for scrap. Tennessee earned a Navy Unit Commendation and 10 battles stars for World War II service.

California (BB-44) California was hit by two torpedoes but had the bad luck to have all of her major watertight hatches unhinged in preparation for an inspection. Hit by two torpedoes and two bombs she sank at her moorings suffering the loss of 98 killed and 61 wounded. She was refloated and received temporary repairs at Pearl Harbor before sailing to Puget Sound Naval Shipyard to be completely rebuilt and modernized with the latest in radar, fire control equipment and anti-aircraft armaments. She returned to service in January 1944. She saw her first action in the Marianas and was in continuous action to the end of the war. She played an important part in the Battle of Surigo Strait and in the amphibious landings at Guam and Tinian, Leyte, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. She was decommissioned in 1947 and placed in reserve finally being sold for scrap in 1959. She received 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Maryland (BB-45) At Pearl Harbor Maryland was moored inboard of Oklahoma and was hit by 2 bombs. She would be quickly repaired and returned to action and receive minimal modernization during the war. She would participate in operations throughout the entirety of the Pacific Campaign providing naval gunfire support to the landings at Tarawa, Kwajalein, Saipan, where she was damaged by an aerial torpedo, Palau, Leyte where she was damaged by a Kamikaze, Okinawa and the battleship action at Surigo Strait. Decommissioned in 1947 she was placed in reserve and sold for scrap in 1959. On 2 June 1961 the Honorable J. Millard Tawes, Governor of Maryland, dedicated a lasting monument to the memory of the venerable battleship and her fighting men. Built of granite and bronze and incorporating the bell of “Fighting Mary,” this monument honors a ship and her 258 men who gave their lives while serving aboard her in WWII. This monument is located on the grounds of the State House, Annapolis, Md. Maryland received seven battle stars for World War II service.

West Virginia (BB-48) West Virginia suffered some of the worst damage in the attack. Hit by at least 5 torpedoes and two bombs she was saved from Oklahoma’s fate by the quick action of her damage control officer to counter flood so she would sink on an even keel. She would be raised, refloated and taken back to the West Coast for an extensive modernization on the order of the Tennessee and California. The last Pearl Harbor battleship to re-enter service she made up for lost time as she lead the battle line at Surigo Strait firing 16 full salvos at the Japanese squadron helping sink the Japanese Battleship Yamashiroin the last battleship versus battleship action in history. West Virginiawas decommissioned in 1947, placed in reserve and sold for scrap in 1959.

Heavy Cruisers

New Orleans (CA-32) Minor shrapnel damage from near miss. Fought throughout the war in the Pacific bow blown off by Japanese torpedo at Battle of Trassafaronga in November 1942, repaired. 17 battle stars for WWII service, decommissioned 1947 and sold for scrap in 1957

San Francisco (CA-38Undamaged at Pearl Harbor, fought through Pacific war, most noted for actions at the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal fighting Japanese Battleship Hiei. Decommissioned 1946 and sold for scrap in 1959. San Francisco earned 17 battle stars during World War II. For her participation in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal, she was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation. For the same action, three members of her crew were awarded the Medal of Honor: Lieutenant Commander Herbert E. Schonland, Lieutenant Commander Bruce McCandless , and Boatswain’s Mate 1st Class Reinhardt J. Keppler (posthumous). Admiral Daniel Callaghan was also awarded the Medal of Honor (posthumous). During the November 1942 repair at Mare Island, it was necessary to extensively rebuild the bridge. The bridge wings were removed as part of that repair, and are now mounted on a promontory in Lands End, San Francisco at Golden Gate National Recreation Area overlooking the Pacific Ocean. They are set on the great circle course from San Francisco to Guadalcanal. The old ship’s bell is housed at the Marines Memorial Club in San Francisco.

Light Cruisers

Raleigh (CL-7) Heavily damaged by torpedo, repaired served throughout war mainly in North Pacific . Decommissioned 1945 and scrapped 1946

Detroit (CL-8) Undamaged and got underway during attack. Mainly served in North Pacific and on convoy duty earning 6 battle stars for WWII service, decommissioned and sold for scrap 1946

Phoenix (CL-46) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor and served throughout war and at the Battle of Surigo Strait she helped sink the Japanese Battleship Fuso. She earned 9 battle stars for WWII service. Decommissioned 1946 and transferred to Argentina 1951. Served as General Belgranoand sunk by submarine HMS Conqueror on 2 May 1982 during the Falklands War.

Honolulu (CL-48) Suffered minor hull damage from near miss. Served in Pacific and fought several engagements against Japanese surface forces in the Solomons. At the Battle of Kolombangara on the night of 12-13 July 1943 she was damaged by a torpedo but sank the Japanese Light Cruiser Jintsu. Earned 9 battle stars for WWII service, decommissioned 1947 and sold for scrap 1949

St. Louis (CL-49) St. Louisgot underway at 0930 nearly torpedoed by Japanese midget sub. She served throughout war in numerous operations and was damaged at the Battle of Kolombangara. She earned 11 battle stars for WWII service. She decommissioned 1946 and transferred to Brazil where she was renamed Tamandare stricken in 1976 sold for scrap in 1980 but sank while under tow to Taiwan.

*Helena (CL-50) Damaged and repaired. Engaged in many battles around Solomon Islands where at the Battle of Cape Esperance at Guadalcanal she sank the Japanese Heavy Cruiser Furutakaand destroyer Fubiki.She was engaged during the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and was sunk at Battle of Kula Gulf 6 July 1943. She was the first ship to be awarded the Naval Unit Commendation and was awarded 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Allen (DD-66)Undamaged during attack spent war in local operations in Oahu area. Decommissioned 1945 and scrapped 1946

Schley (DD-103) Being overhauled on December 7th was undamaged in attack. Converted into High Speed Transport (APD) in 1942, earned 11 battle stars for WWII service and decommissioned in 1945 and scrapped in 1946

Chew (DD-106)Undamaged during attack and conducted local operations in Oahu operations for remainder or war, decommissioned 1945 and scrapped 1946

*Ward (DD-139) Ward was underway patrolling Channel entrance to Pearl Harbor on December 7 th , sank Japanese midget submarine. Converted to APD in 1943 and served in numerous operations prior to being heavily damaged by Japanese bombers at Ormoc Bay off Leyte in December 1944 starting fires that could not be controlled. She was sunk by USS O’Brien (DD-725) after survivors were rescued. By a strange twist of fate the C.O. of O’Brien LCDR Outerbridge who had commanded Ward when she sank the Japanese submarine at Pearl Harbor. Wardearned 10 battle stars for WWII service.

Dewey (DD-349) Being overhauled on December 7 th Dewey served throughout the war earning 13 battle stars escorting carriers, convoys and supporting amphibious operations. Decommissioned October 1945 and sold for scrap 1946

Farragut (DD-348) Got underway during attack suffered minor damage from strafing. During the war she operated from the Aleutians to the South Pacific and Central Pacific escorting carriers and supporting amphibious operations. She earned 14 battle stars for WWII service. Decommissioned 1945 and sold for scrap 1947

*Hull (DD-350) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor she operated from the Aleutians to the South Pacific and Central Pacific escorting carriers and supporting amphibious operations. She earned 10 battle stars before sinking in “Halsey’s Typhoon” on 18 December 1944.

MacDonough (DD-351) MacDonough got underway during attack and was undamaged, during war served in North and Central Pacific escorting carriers and supporting amphibious operations. She earned 13 battle stars for her WWII service. Decommissioned October 1945 and sold for scrap 1946

*Worden (DD-352) Worden got underway during attack and went to sea with ships searching for Japanese strike force. Served at Midway and the South Pacific before being transferred to the Aleutians where she grounded on a pinnacle due to winds and currents at Constantine Harbor Amchitka Island on 12 January 193, she broke up in the surf and was written off as a total loss. Worden was awarded 4 battle stars for her WWII service.

Dale (DD-353) Dale got underway immediately under the command of her Command Duty Officer, an Ensign and joined ships searching for Japanese strike force. During war served in North and Central Pacific and took part in the Battle of the Komandorski Islands on 26 March 1943. Earned 12 battle stars for WWII service, decommissioned October 1945 sold for scrap December 1946.

*Monaghan (DD-354) Monaghanwas the Ready destroyer on December 7 th and ordered underway when Ward sank the midget submarine. On way out of harbor rammed, depth charged and sank a Japanese midget submarine that had gotten into Pearl Harbor. She participated in Coral Sea, Midway, Aleutians, the Battle of the Komandorski Islands and Central Pacific operations before sinking with the loss of all but 6 crewmen during the great Typhoon of November 1944 sinking on 17 November. She received 12 battle stars for her WWII service.

Aylwin (DD-355)Got underway within an hour of the beginning of the attack with 50% of her crew and four officers, all Ensigns manning her leaving her Commanding Officer and others behind in a launch as she was under direction not to stop for anything. This was captured in the movie In Harm’s Way. During the war Aylwin saw action at Coral Sea, Midway, Guadalcanal, the Aleutians, and the Central Pacific up to the Okinawa and due to the action of her crew survived the great typhoon of November 1944. She earned 13 battle stars for her WWII service and was decommissioned in October 1945. She was sold for scrap in December 1946.

Selfridge (DD-357) Manned by a crew from 7 different ships Selfridge got underway at 1300 and was undamaged in the attack. Throughout war she served primarily as an escort to carriers and transports. Torpedoed by Japanese destroyer and lost her bow at Battle of Vella Lavella on 6 October 1942. Repaired and finished war. Earned 4 battle stars for WWII service and was decommissioned in October 1945 and sold for scrap in December 1946.

Phelps (DD-360) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Phelps was credited with shooting down one enemy aircraft. She was in action at Coral Sea, Midway, Guadalcanal, the Aleutians and the Central Pacific picking up 12 battle stars for her WWII service. Decommissioned in October 1945 and scrapped 1947.

Cummings (DD-365)Sustained minor damage from bomb fragments but got underway quickly. During war served on convoy escort, with fast carrier task forces and provided Naval Gunfire Support from the Aleutians to the Indian Ocean where she operated with the Royal Navy. On 12 August 1944, President Roosevelt broadcast a nationwide address from the forecastle of Cummings after a trip the Alaska. Cummings was decommissioned in December 1945 and sold for scrap in 1947.

*Reid (DD-369) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Reidescorted convoys and amphibious operations throughout the Pacific until she was sunk by Kamikazes at Ormoc Bay in the Philippines on 11 December 1944. On 31 August 1942 she sank by gunfire the Japanese submarine RO-1 off Adak Alaska. She received 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Case (DD-370) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Caseescorted the fast carrier task forces throughout much of the war as well as conducted Anti-Submarine Warfare operations and Naval Gunfire Support. She sank a Midget submarine outside the fleet anchorage at Ulithi on 20 November 1944 and a Japanese transport off of Iwo Jima on 24 December 1944. She earned 7 battle stars for her WWII service and was decommissioned in December 1945 and sold for scrap in December 1947.

Conyngham (DD-371)Undamaged during attack she was underway that afternoon. Spent most of war on convoy escort, escorting carrier task forces and conducting Naval Gunfire Support missions she was damaged twice by strafing Japanese aircraft she earned 14 battle stars for her WWII service. Used in 1946 Atomic Bomb tests and destroyed by sinking in 1948.

Cassin (DD-372) Destroyed in drydock but salvaged returned to service 1944 escorting convoys and TG 38.1 the Battle Force of the fleet at Leyte Gulf as well as supporting amphibious operations. She earned 6 battle stars for her WWII service. Decommissioned December 1945 and sold for scrap 1947

Shaw (DD-373) Sustained massive damage due to magazine explosion, salvaged and repaired served throughout war and awarded 11 battle stars. Damaged by Japanese dive bombers off Cape Gloucester on 25 December 1943 with loss of 3 killed and 33 wounded. Decommissioned October 1945 and scrapped 1947

*Tucker (DD-374) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Tuckerconducted convoy escort operations and was sunk when she struck a mine escorting a transport to Espiritu Santo on 1 August 1942 sinking on 4 August. She received one battle star for her WWII service.

Downes (DD-375) Destroyed in drydock and salvaged. Decommissioned June 1942, rebuilt and recommissioned 1943. After she was recommissioned and used to escort convoys and conduct Naval Gunfire Support to amphibious operations. She earned 4 battle stars for her WWII service. Decommissioned 1947 and sold for scrap.

Bagley (DD-386) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Bagley conducted convoy escort operations and supported amphibious landings throughout the Pacific earning 1 battle stars ended the war on occupation duty at the Sasebo-Nagasaki area until returning to the United States. She earned 12 battle stars for her WWII service and was decommissioned in June 1946 and sold for scrap in October 1947.

*Blue (DD-387) Blue was undamaged and got underway during the attack under the direction of 4 Ensigns. Served on convoy escort duties, present at Battle of Savo Island on 9 August 192 and was torpedoed off Guadalcanal by Japanese destroyer Kawakaze on 21 August and was scuttled 22 August. She earned five battle stars for her WWII service.

Helm (DD-388) Helmwas underway, nearing West Loch at the time of the attack. Helm served in the Solomons and the South Pacific until February 19. She joined the fast carrier task forces of 5 th Fleet in May 1944. On 28 October at Leyte Gulf 28 October 1944 Helm and companion destroyer Gridley made sank the Japanese submarine I-46. She was used for a target during Operation Crossroads and scrapped in 1946. She received 11 battle stars for her WWII service.

Mugford (DD-389) Mugford was on standby status and had steam up which allowed her to get to sea during the attack in which she shot down Japanese aircraft. She spent much of 1942 on convoy duty between the U.S. and Australia. She took part in the Guadalcanal invasion and was struck by a bomb which killed 8 men, wounded 17 and left 10 missing in action. She would go on to serve in the Central and South Pacific being damaged by a near miss from a bomb on 25 December off Cape Gloucester and was stuck by a Kamikaze on 5 December 1944 in Surigo Strait. She escorted the fast carriers of TF 8 and 58 and later served on anti-submarine and radar picket duty. She decommissioned 1946 and was used in the Atomic Bomb tests and after use as a test ship for radioactive decontamination was sunk on 22 March 1948 at Kwajalein. She received 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Ralph Talbot (DD-390) Ralph Talbotgot underway by 0900 on the morning of the attack and joined other ships at sea attempting to find the Japanese strike force. She spent much of 1942 engaged in escort duties and took part in the Battle of Savo Island where she engaged the Japanese as part of the Northern Group and was damaged by Japanese shellfire. She spent the war in the South and Central Pacific escorting convoys and supporting amphibious operations and was damaged by a Kamikaze off Okinawa. She remained in service until 1946 when she was assigned to JTF-1 and the Operations Crossroads Atomic Bomb test. She survived the blast and was sunk in 198. She earned 12 battle stars for her WWII service.

*Henley (DD-391) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Henley was already at General Quarters when the attack began because a new sailor sounded the General Quarters alarm instead of Quarters for Muster. As a result her weapons were manned. She got underway during the attack under the command of a junior Lieutenant and joined other ships patrolling outside of Pearl Harbor. Henley carried out convoy and anti-submarine patrols mainly around Australian continuing those duties through the Guadalcanal campaign. She was torpedoed and sunk by Japanese bombers on 3 October 1943 while conducting a sweep in support of troops ashore near Finshafen New Guinea. Henley earned 4 battle stars for her WWII service.

Patterson (DD-392) Patterson was undamaged during the attack and proceeded to sea conducting anti-submarine warfare patrols. She would spend the bulk of the war as an escort for fast carrier task forces. She was with the Southern Group during the Battle of Savo Island and suffered a hit on her #4 gun mount that killed 10 sailors. She was awarded 13 battle stars for her WWII service. Decommissioned in November 1945 she was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register in 1947 and sold for scrap.

*Jarvis (DD-393) Jarvis survived Pearl Harbor undamaged and got underway to join other ships in patrols around Oahu. She served as an escort for carriers and convoys and the invasion of Guadalcanal. She was heavily damaged by an aircraft launched torpedo during the landings but her crew made temporary repairs and restored power. She was ordered to Efate New Hebrides but evidently unaware of the order her Commanding Officer set sail for Sidney Australian and repairs from the Destroyer Tender USS Dobbin. She passed south of Savo Island as the Japanese cruiser force approached and refused assistance for the USS Blue. She was last seen on the morning of 9 August 1942 by a scout plane from Saratoga. Already heavily damaged and having little speed, no radio communications and few operable guns was attacked by a force of 31 Japanese bombers sinking with all hands at 1300 on 9 August. Jarvis was awarded 3 battle stars for her WWII service.

Narwhal (SS-167) Narwhal was one of a class of three large cruiser submarines that was built in the mid 1920s. Narwhal was 14 years old at the time of the attack. She was undamaged at Pearl Harbor and was used primarily to support special missions and special operations forces in raids against Japanese shore installations. Narwhal earned 15 battle stars for her service in the Pacific and was decommissioned in February 1945 and sold for scrap in May. Her 6” guns are enshrined at the Naval Submarine Base Groton.

Dolphin (SS-169) Undamaged in the Pearl Harbor attack Dolphin made 3 war patrols in late 1941 and early 1942 before being withdrawn from combat service and used for training due to her age. She was decommissioned in October 1945 and sold for scrap in 1946. She received 2 battle stars for her service in WWII.

Cachalot (SS-170) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Cachalot conducted three war patrols damaging an enemy tanker before being withdrawn from combat service in the fall of 1942 being judged too old for arduous combat service. She served as a training ship until June 1945 and was decommissioned in October 1945 and sold for scrap in January 1947. She was awarded 3 battle stars for her WWII service.

Tautog (SS-199) Tautogwas undamaged at Pearl Harbor and made the Japanese pay for not sinking her. She helped avenge the Pearl Harbor attack sinking 26 enemy ships of 71,900 tons including the submarines RO-30 and I-28 and destroyers Isoname and Shirakumoin 13 war patrols. She was withdrawn from combat service in April 1945 and served and operated in conjunction with the University of California’s Department of War Research in experimenting with new equipment which it had developed to improve submarine safety. She was decommissioned in December 1945. Spared from the Atomic Bomb tests she served as an immobile reserve training ship in the Great Lakes until 1957 and was scrapped in 1960. Tautogwas awarded 14 battle stars and a Naval Unit Commendation for her service in WWII.

Oglala (CM-4)Sank due to concussion from torpedo hit on Helena. Raised and repaired, converted to internal combustion repair ship. Decommissioned 1946 transferred to Maritime Commission custody and scrapped 1965

Minesweepers

Turkey (AM-13) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor she was redesignated as a Fleet Tug in 1942. She was decommissioned in November 1945 and sold for scrap in 1946. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Bobolink (AM-20) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor and redesignated as an Ocean Going Tug in 1942. She decommissioned in 1946 and sold through the Maritime Administration. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Rail (AM-26) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Rail was redesignated as a Ocean Going Tug in June 1942. She supported operations throughout the Pacific earning 6 battle stars for her WWII service. She was decommissioned in 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Administration for disposal in 1947.

Tern (AM-31) Undamaged in the attack Tern was redesignated as an Ocean Going Tug in June 1942 and supported the fleet for the remainder of the war. She was decommissioned and struck from the Navy List in December 1945. She earned one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

*Grebe (AM-43) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Grebewas redesignated as an Ocean Going Tug in June 1942. On 6 December 1942 Grebe grounded while attempting to float SS Thomas A. Edison at Vuanta Vatoa, Fiji Islands. Salvage operations were broken up by a hurricane that destroyed both ships 1-2 January 1943.

Vireo (AM-52) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Vireo was designated an Ocean Going Tug in May 1942. At the Battle of Midway she was assisting USS Yorktown CV-5when that ship was torpedoed by a Japanese submarine and sunk. She was damaged in a Japanese air strike off Guadalcanal on October 15 th 1942 abandoned but recovered by U.S. Forces and repaired supporting damaged fleet units. She was decommissioned in 1946 and disposed of by the Maritime Administration in 1947. Her final disposition is unknown. She was awarded 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Coastal Minesweepers

Cockatoo (AMC-8) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Cockatoo operated in the 14th Naval District from Pearl Harbor throughout the war. She was transferred to the Maritime Commission 23 September 1946.

Crossbill (AMC-9)Undamaged in the attack she operated in an in-service status attached to the 14th Naval District from 1941 to 1947.

Condor (AMC-14) Undamaged in the attack she operated in the Hawaiian Islands throughout World War II. Placed out of service 17 January 1946, she was transferred to the Maritime Commission for disposal 24 July 1946.

Reedbird (AMC-30) Undamaged during the attack she operated in Hawaiian waters throughout World War II. Then ordered inactivated, Reedbird returned to San Diego where she was stripped and placed out of service 14 January 1946. Her name was struck from the Navy list 7 February 1946 and on 8 November 1946 she was delivered to the Maritime Commission for disposal.

Light Minelayers (Note: All of these ships were WWI era “four piper” destroyers converted to Mine Warfare ships in the 1920s and 1930s)

*Gamble (DM-15) Gamble was undamaged at Pearl Harbor and served throughout the Pacific. On 29 August 1942 she sank Japanese submarine I-123 near Guadalcanal. On 6 May 1943 she mined the Blackett Strait with her sisters USS Preble and USS Breese. On the night of 7-8 May a Japanese destroyer force entered the minefield one of which Kurashio, went down and two others Oyashio and Kagerowere sunk by Allied aircraft the next day. The sinking of Kagero provided a measure of revenge as that ship was part of the Japanese Carrier Strike Group that attacked Pearl Harbor. On 18 February 1945 Gamble was damaged by two bombs while operating off of Iwo Jima. Badly damaged she was towed to Saipan but salvage was impossible and she was decommissioned sunk off of Apra Harbor Guam on 16 July 1945. She was awarded 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Ramsay (DM-16) Ramsey got underway during the attack and dropped depth charges in the vicinity of what was believed to be a midget submarine. She served in the Solomons and Aleutians and was redesignated as a Miscellaneous Auxiliary (AG-98) in 1944 operating around Pearl Harbor. She was decommissioned in October 1945 and scrapped in 1946. She received 3 battle stars for her WWII service.

*Montgomery (DM-17) Undamaged in the attack Montgomery conducted ASW operations in the wake of the attack. She operated throughout the Pacific until she was damaged by a mine while anchored off Ngulu on 17 October 1944. She was decommissioned on 23 April 1945 and sold for scrap in 1946. She was awarded 4 battle stars for her WWII service.

Breese (DM-18) Breese got underway during the attack and assisted in sinking a midget submarine. She was engaged throughout the war in the Pacific and operated with Gamble and Preble to mine the Blackett Strait in May 1943, an operation that resulted in the sinking of 3 Japanese destroyers. She was decommissioned and sold for scrap in 1946. She was awarded 10 battle stars for her WWII service.

Tracy (DM-19) Tracy was being overhauled during the attack and all machinery and armament was dismounted. After the overhaul she operated around the Pacific and in February 1943 she Tracy, as task group leader, led Montgomery (DM-17) and Preble (DM-20) in laying a field of 300 mines between Doma Reef and Cape Esperance. That night, Japanese destroyer Makigumo struck one of these mines and was damaged so badly that she was scuttled. Tracy was decommissioned and scrapped in 1946. She received 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Preble (DM-20) Preble was being overhauled on December 7 th and took no part in the action. During the war she operated throughout the Pacific and in company with Gamble and Breese laid a minefield on 6 May 1943 which resulted in sinking 3 Japanese destroyers. She was redesignated as a Miscellaneous Auxiliary (AG-99) and she was regulated to convoy escort duties until the end of the war. She was decommissioned in December 1945 and sold for scrap in 1946. She was awarded 8 battle stars for WWII service.

Sicard (DM-21) Sicard was under overhaul at the Naval Shipyard during the attack. During the war she primarily served on convoy escort duty with and in some mine laying operations. She was reclassified a miscellaneous auxiliary, AG-100, effective 5 June 1945, decommissioned in December 1945 and sold for scrap in 1946. She was awarded 2 battle stars for her WWII service.

Pruitt (DM-22)Pruitt was being overhauled during the attack and served throughout the Pacific during the war. She was reclassified a miscellaneous auxiliary, AG-101, effective 5 June 1945, decommissioned November and stricken from the Navy List in December 1945 being scrapped at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. She was awarded 3 battle stars for her WWII service.

High Speed Minesweepers (Note: All of these ships were WWI era “four piper” destroyers converted to Mine Warfare ships in the 1920s and 1930s)

Zane (DMS-14)Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Zane saw much service in the South and Central Pacific in WWII. She conducted minesweeping, convoy escort and ASW operations from Pearl Harbor to the Marianas campaign. She was damaged in a firefight with Japanese destroyers at Guadalcanal in 1942. After the invasion of Guam she was reassigned to target towing duties. Reclassified from high-speed minesweeper to a miscellaneous auxiliary, AG-109, on 5 June 1945 she decommissioned in December 1945 and sold for scrap in 1946. She was awarded 6 battle stars and a Naval Unit Commendation for her service in WWII.

*Wasmuth (DMS-15) Wasmuthwas undamaged during the attack and spent 1942 conducting patrol and convoy escort duties in the Aleutians and the West Coast. On 27 December 1942 while escorting a convoy in heavy seas two of her depth charges were ripped off their racks and exploded under her fantail blowing off her stern. Despite repair attempts her crew was evacuated and she sank on 29 December 1942. She was awarded one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Trever (DMS-16) Trever got underway during the attack without her Commanding Officer. During the war she saw extensive service. In 1945 she was regulated to training and local operations around Pearl Harbor. On 4 June 1945, she was reclassified as a miscellaneous auxiliary and designated as AG-110 and decommissioned in December 1945 and sold for scrapping in 1946. She received 5 battle stars for her WWII service.

*Perry (DMS-17) Perry got underway during the attack and was undamaged. During the war she engaged in numerous minesweeping and escort duties. She struck a mine during the Peleliu invasion off Florida Island and sank on 6 September 1944. She was awarded 6 battle stars for her WWII service.

Sacramento (PG-19) The elderly Sacramento was undamaged during the attack and participated in rescue and salvage operations after the attack. During the war she served as a tender for PT Boats and an air sea rescue vessel. Sacramento was decommissioned on 6 February 1946 at Suisun Bay, Calif., and simultaneously transferred to the War Shipping Administration for disposal. She was sold on 23 August 1947 for mercantile service, initially operating under Italian registry as Fermina. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Destroyer Tenders

Dobbin (AD-3) Dobbin received minor damage from a bomb burst alongside which killed 2 crewmembers. During the war she would serve in the South Pacific supporting Pacific Fleet Destroyer Squadrons. She was decommissioned and transferred to the Maritime Administration in 1946. She was awarded one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Whitney (AD-4) Whitney was moored with a nest of destroyers during the attack and helped them prepare for sea during the attack issuing supplies and ammunition to help them get underway. Her sailors helped in repair and salvage operations on several ships during and after the attack. She would provide vital support to destroyer squadrons during the war and serve until 1946 when she was decommissioned and transferred to the Maritime Administration and scrapped in 1948. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Seaplane Tenders

Curtiss (AV-4) Damaged by bomb and repaired. She served throughout the war and was damaged by a Kamikaze in 1945 while operating off Okinawa. Repaired she finished the war and served on active duty until 1956 when she was decommissioned and placed in reserve. She was scrapped 1972. Curtiss received 7 battle stars for her WWII service.

Tangier (AV-8) Moored just past the USS Utah Tangier was undamaged in the attack and contributed her guns to the air defense as well as shooting at a Japanese midget submarine that had penetrated the harbor. She maintained a very active operational carrier in the Pacific. Decommissioned in 1946 Tangier was sold for scrap in 1961. She earned 3 battle stars for her WWII service.

Seaplane Tenders (Small)

Avocet (AVP-4) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Avocet Avocetserved in the Alaskan and Aleutian theatres of operations as a unit of Patrol Wing 4. During the years, she tended patrol squadrons, transported personnel and cargo, and participated in patrol, survey, and salvage duties. She was decommissioned in December 1945 and sold in 1946. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Swan (AVP-7) Swan was on the Marine Railway drydock during the attack and was undamaged. During the war she was primarily used on target towing duties. She was decommissioned in December 1945 and disposed of by the Maritime Commission in 1946. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Seaplane Tenders (Destroyer) (Note: All of these ships were WWI era “four piper” destroyers converted to Seaplane Tenders in the 1920s and 1930s)

Hulbert (AVD-6) Hulbertwas undamaged during the attack and spent 1942-1943 conducting support missions for flying boats. Reclassified DD-342 she was used as an escort and plane guard for new Escort Carriers at San Diego until the end of the war. She was decommissioned in November 1945 and sold for scrap in 1946. She received 2 battle stars for her WWII service.

*Thornton (AVD-11) Thornton contributed her guns to the defense of Pearl Harbor and served in varying locales in the Pacific supporting the operations of flying boats. She was lost during the Okinawa invasion when collided with Ashtabula (AO-51) and Escalante (AO-70). Her starboard side was severely damaged. She was towed to Kerama Retto. On 29 May 1945 a board of inspection and survey recommended that Thornton be decommissioned, beached stripped of all useful materiel as needed, and then abandoned. She was beached and decommissioned on 2 May 1945. Her name was struck from the Navy list on 13 August 1945. In July 1957, Thornton’s abandoned hulk was donated to the government of the Ryukyu Islands. She received 3 battle stars for her WWII service.

Ammunition Ship

Pyro (AE-1) Pyro was undamaged in the attack and served the war transporting ammunition to naval bases around the Pacific. She was decommissioned in 1946 and scrapped in 1950. She was awarded one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Ramapo (AO-12) Ramapo was not damaged at Pearl Harbor and due to her slow speed was regulated to fuel transport operations between the Aleutians and the Puget Sound. She was decommissioned in 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Administration.

*Neosho (AO-23) Undamaged during the attack her Captain alertly moved her from her berth near Battleship Row to a less exposed part of the harbor. She operated with the carrier task forces and was heavily damaged at the Battle of Coral Sea by Japanese aircraft. Her crew kept her afloat for 4 days until she was discovered and her crew rescued before she was sunk by gunfire from USS Henley on 11 May 1942. Neosho was awarded 2 battle stars for her WWII service.

Repair Ships

Medusa (AR-1) Medusa was undamaged at Pearl Harbor and spent the war throughout the South Pacific repairing numerous vessels damaged in combat. After the war she served to prepare ships for inactivation before being decommissioned in 1947 and turned over to the Maritime Administration. She was scrapped in 1950. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Vestal (AR-4) Vestal was damaged while moored adjacent to USS Arizona. Repaired following the attack Vestal served throughout war in the Pacific and was vital during the critical days of 1942 when she and her crew performed valiant service on major fleet units damaged during the Guadalcanal campaign and actions around the Solomon Islands. Carriers Enterprise and Saratoga, battleships South Dakota and North Carolina, cruisers San Francisco, New Orleans, Pensacola and St. Louiswere among the 5,603 jobs on 279 ships and 24 shore activities that she completed in a 12 month tour at Espiratu Santo. She would continue to perform this level of service the remainder of the war. During a stint at Ulithi she completed 2,195 jobs for 149 ships including 14 battleships, 9 carriers, 5 cruisers and 5 destroyers. She continued her vital work even after the war into 1946 when she was finally decommissioned. She was sold for scrap in 1950. She received 1 battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Rigel (AR-11) Rigelwas at Pearl Harbor completing her transformation from Destroyer Tender to Repari Ship. She incurred minor damage and she served throughout the war conducting vital repairs to numerous ships. She was decommissioned and transferred to the Maritime Administration in 1946. Her ultimate fate is unknown. She was awarded 4 battle stars for her WWII service.

Submarine Tender

Pelias (AS-14) Undamaged during the attack Peliassupported submarine squadrons based in the Pacific throughout the war. She was placed in commission in reserve 6 September 1946, and in service in reserve 1 February 1947. On 21 March 1950 she was placed out of service in reserve but later performed berthing ship duty at Mare Island until she decommissioned 14 June 1970. She was scrapped in 1973.

Submarine Rescue Ship

Widgeon (ASR-1) Widgeon conducted salvage, rescue and fire fighting operations on the sunk and damaged battleships on battleship row. During the war she served as the duty submarine rescue ship at Pearl Harbor and San Diego. After the war she supported the Operation Crossroads. She was decommissioned and sold for scrap in 1947. She received on battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Hospital Ship

Solace (AH-5)Solace was undamaged in the attack and provided medical care to many of the wounded after the attack. She served throughout the war caring for the wounded and dying in the Gilberts, the Marshalls, Guam, Saipan, Palau, Peleliu, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Solace was decommissioned at Norfolk on 27 March, struck from the Navy list on 21 May, and returned to the War Shipping Administration on 18 July 1946. She was sold to the Turkish Maritime Lines on 16 April 1948 and renamed SS Ankara, rebuilt as a passenger liner. SS Ankara was laid up in 1977 and scrapped at Aliaga, Turkey, in 1981. Solace received seven battle stars for World War II service.

Vega (AK-17) Vega was at Honolulu offloading ammunition when the attack occurred. She served in the Aleutians and in the Central Pacific during the war. Decommissioned and scrapped in 1946. She received 4 battle stars for her WWII service.

General-Stores-Issue Ships

Castor (AKS-1) Castor was strafed by Japanese aircraft during the attack but suffered little damage. She would go on to an illustrious career in WWII, Korea and Vietnam before being decommissioned 1968 and scrapped in Japan in 1969. She was awarded three battle stars for World War II service, two for Korean War service and six campaign stars for Vietnam War service.

Antares (AKS-3) Antares was at the Pearl Harbor entrance and spotted a midget submarine. She reported the contact to the USS Ward which sank the sub. During the war Antares made many supply runs in the Pacific and was at Okinawa. Sailing from Saipan to Pearl Harbor she was attacked by the Japanese submarines I-36, whose torpedoes missed their target and the kaiten-carrying I-165.She opened fire on one of the subs forcing it to dive. She was decommissioned in 1946 and sold for scrap in 1947. She was awarded 2 battle stars for her WWII service.

Ocean-going Tugs

Ontario (AT-13) Undamaged at Pearl Harbor Ontario would support operations in the Pacific throughout the war. She was decommissioned in 1946 and sold in 1947. She received one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Sunnadin (AT-28) Undamaged in the attack she operated at Pearl Harbor for the duration of the war. She was decommissioned in 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Administration. Her final disposition is unknown. She was awarded one battle star for her service during the Pearl Harbor attack.

Keosanqua (AT-38) Keosanqua was at the Pearl Harbor entrance preparing to transfer a tow from the USS Antares. She took the tow to Honolulu during the attack. She operated at Pearl Harbor and in the Central Pacific conducting towing operations. She was decommissioned in 1946 ransferred to the Maritime Commission 11 July for disposal, she was sold the same day to Puget Sound Tug & Barge Co., Seattle, Wash. Resold to a Canadian shipping firm in 1948, she was renamed Edward J. Coyle. In 1960 she was renamed Commodore Straits.

*Navajo (AT-64) Navaho was 12 miles outside Pearl Harbor entrance when the attack occurred. She operated in the South Pacific until 12 December 1942 when she was torpedoed and sunk by the Japanese submarine I-39 while towing gasoline barge YOG-42 150 miles east of Espiritu Santo, 12 December 1943 with the loss of all but 17 of her crew of 80. She earned 2 battle stars for her WWII service.

Miscellaneous Auxiliaries

*Utah (AG-16 ex-BB-31) Sunk at her moorings and righted 1944 but not raised, wreck is now a memorial at Ford Island.

Argonne (AG-31) Argonne was undamaged during the attack and served in a variety of capacities during the war supporting operations in the Pacific. For a time she was Admiral Halsey’s flagship as Commander Southwest Pacific in 1942 during the Guadalcanal Campaign. On 10 November 1944, Argonne lay moored to a buoy in berth 14, Seeadler Harbor, when the ammunition ship Mount Hood (AE-11) blew up, 1,100 yards away causing damage to her and other ships which she assisted after the explosion. She was decommissioned in 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Administration. She was scrapped in 1950. Argonne was awarded one battle star for her service at Pearl Harbor.

Sumner (AG-32) Sumner was undamaged during the attack and was redesignated as a Survey Ship AGS-5. She was damaged by a Japanese shell off Iwo Jima on 8 March 1945. She was decommissioned in 1946 and transferred to the Maritime Administration. She was awarded 3 battle stars for her WWII service.


USS Schley (DD-103) after refit, 1943 - History

(Coast Guard Cutter No. 68: dp. 2,702 (f.), l. 327', b. 41'2" dr. 14' (mean) s. 20.8 k. cpl. 123 a. 2 5".2 6-pdrs., 1 1-pdr., 2 .50-car. mg. cl. "Secretary")

Roger B. Taney (Coast Guard Cutter No. 68) was laid down on 1 May 1935 at the Philadelphia Navy Yard launched on 3 June 1936, sponsored by Miss Corinne F. Taney and commissioned at Philadelphia on 24 October 1936, Comdr. W. K. Thompson, USCG, in command.

Roger B. Taney departed Philadelphia on 19 December, transited the Panama Canal from the 27th to the 29th, and arrived at her home port, Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii, on 18 January 1937. She conducted local operations out of Honolulu through the summer of 1937.

Roger B. Taney had arrived in the Pacific at a time when the United States was expanding its commercial air travel capabilities. The "Clipper" flights across the Pacific to the Far East made islands like Hawaii, Midway, Guam, and Wake important way-stations. Other islands and islets assumed greater importance when a route across the South Pacific was mapped out to Australia and Samoa. The military benefits which accrued to the United States by its expansion onto some of the more strategic bits of land in the broad Pacific were not lost upon President Franklin D. Roosevelt, who undertook, in the late 1930's, to annex territory in the Pacific.

Two such places were Canton and Enderbury Islands. Roger B. Taney played a role in their colonization by the United States. In early March 1938, the Coast Guard cutter loaded supplies and embarked colonists who would establish the claim of the United States upon the two islands that seemed-at least to the uninitiated —to be mere hunks of coral, rock, and scrub in the Central Pacific. Roger B. Taney disembarked four Hawaiians at Enderbury Island on 6 March 1938 and landed a second contingent-of seven colonists-at Canton Island on the next day. The men, assisted by the Coast Guardsmen, erected buildings and laid the foundations for future signal towers.

The Coast Guard's task over the ensuing years leading up to the outbreak of war in the Pacific was to supply these isolated way-stations along the transpacific air routes and to relieve the colonists at stated intervals. Roger B. Taney performed these supply missions into 1940. Meanwhile, tension continued to rise in the Far East as Japan cast covetous glances at the American British, Dutch, and French colonial possessions and marched deeper into embattled China.

As the Navy and Coast Guard began gradually increasing and augmenting the armament on its vessels to prepare them for the inexorably advancing war, Roger B. Taney underwent her first major rearmament at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard in December 1940. She received her last major pre-war refit at the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, Calif., in the spring of the following year, 1941.

On 25 July 1941, the Coast Guard cutter was transferred to the Navy and reported for duty with the local defense forces of the 14th Naval District, maintaining her base at Honolulu. By this time, the ship's name had apparently been shortened to Taney.

Outside of another "line island cruise" in the late summer, Taney operated locally out of Honolulu into the critical fall of 1941. She conducted regular harbor entrance and channel patrols, alternating often with one of the four old destroyers of Destroyer Division 80: Allen (DD-66), Schley (DD-103), Chew (DD-106), and Ward (DD-139).

The message: "Air Raid, Pearl Harbor. This is no drill" came at 0755 on 7 December, as Japanese planes swept overhead in an attempt to cripple the Pacific Fleet's retaliatory power. Taney, moored alongside Pier 6, Honolulu harbor, stood to her antiaircraft guns swiftly when word of the surprise attack reached her simultaneously. As no Japanese attacks were directed at Honolulu harbor, the Coast Guard cutter was only given the opportunity to fire at stray aircraft which happened to venture into her vicinity. She was firing upon unidentified aircraft as late as noon, indicating that the eager Coast Guardsmen were probably shooting at American planes-not Japanese.

Taney patrolled the waters off Honolulu for the remainder of 1941 and into 1942, conducting many depth charge attacks on suspected submarines in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack. During this time, the ship received the classification WPG-37. On 22 January 1942, the cutter departed Honolulu in company with SS Barbara Olson, and arrived at Canton Island on the 28th. After sending a working party ashore to unload supplies, Taney screened Barbara Olson offshore until 7 February, when both ships got underway to evacuate the American colony on Enderbury Island. Embarking the four colonists at 1015 that day, Taney shelled the island and destroyed the buildings there before sailing for Jarvis Island.

Taney subsequently escorted her merchantman consort to Jarvis Island, where she evacuated the four Interior Department colonists and burned all structures to the ground before departing. Reaching Palmyra on the 12th, the ships remained there until the 15th, before

Taney headed back for the Hawaiian Islands, arriving at Honolulu on 5 March.

Taney operated locally out of Honolulu into 1943 before sailing for Boston late that winter. Prior to heading for the east coast, the ship received a regunning at Mare Island, being fitted with four singlemount, 5-inch guns, making her the only ship in her class with this mod)fication. After making port at Boston on 14 March 1944, Taney soon shifted south to Hampton Roads, where she arrived on 31 March. Early in April, she departed Norfolk as a unit of Task Force (TF) 66 as convoy guide for convoy UGS

The passage across the Atlantic proved uneventful as the convoy made landfall off the Azores on 13 April. Some 35 minutes after sunset on the 20th, the convoy was spotted and tracked by the Germans, who launched a three-pronged attack with Junkers 88's and Heinkel ill's participating. Each flew very low, using the shoreline as a background, thus confusing the search radar of the Allied ships. The first wave struck from dead ahead, torpedoing SS Paul Hamilton and SS Samite. The former, which had been carrying ammunition, blew up in a shattering explosion-and all 504 men on board her were killed in the blast.

The second wave of German torpedo planes bagged SS Stephen F. Au

tin and SS Royal Star, during this melee, two torpedoes churned past Taney close aboard. The third wave mortally wounded Lansdale (DD-426), which later sank. All of the damaged vessels-save Paul Hamilton and Lansdale-reached Bizerte, Tunisia, on the 21st. Taney later departed Bizerte with homeward-bound convoy GUS-38 and arrived at New York on 21 May.

The Coast Guard cutter conducted two more roundtrip convoy escort missions, with convoys UGS/GUS45 and UGS/GUS-52. Detached as a unit of TF 66 on 9 October 1944, Taney sailed for the Boston Navy Yard soon thereafter for extensive yard work to convert her to an amphibious command ship. During this metamorphosis, Taney-classified as WAGC-37—was fitted with accommodations for an embarked flag officer and his staff, as well as with increased communications and radar facilities. Her main battery, too, underwent a change: she now sported two open-mount 5-inch guns as well as 40 and 20 millimeter antiaircraft guns. With the work completed in early January 1945, Taney departed Boston on 19 January, bound for Norfolk, Va.

She conducted shakedown and training in her new configuration before departing the east coast and sailing, via the Panama Canal and San Diego, to Hawaii. Arriving at Pearl Harbor On 22 February 1945 she soon embarked Rear Admiral Calvin H. Cobb and later underwent various minor repairs. New communications equipment was also installed before the ship departed the Hawaiian Islands for the Marshalls on 10 March.

Taney proceeded independently via Eniwetok and arrived at Ulithi on 23 March, remaining there until 7 April. Joining TG 51.8, the amphibious command ship proceeded to Okinawa and arrived off the Hagushi beaches amidst air raid alerts on the 11th. During one raid, her antiaircraft gunners scored at least three hits on a "Betty" bomber which crossed the ship's bow 1,200 yards away, and later during her first day at Okinawa experienced four more "red alerts." The ship briefly shifted to Kerama Retto from the 13th to the 15th before returning to Hanushi on the latter date.

By the end of May, Taney had gone to general quarters 119 times, with the crew remaining at battle stations for up to nine hours at a stretch. During this period off Okinawa in April and May, Taney downed four suicide planes and assisted in numerous other "kills." The command ship also conducted combat information center duties, maintaining complete radar and air coverage, receiving and evaluating information on both friendly and enemy activities. On one occasion, Taney's duties took her close inshore-close enough to even receive fire close aboard from a Japanese shore battery.

Suicide air attacks by the Japanese continued throughout June, although most were intercepted by combat air patrol (CAP) fighters and downed before they could reach their targets. Such raids took place on 18 out of 30 days that month. On 25 June, at 0120 a float seaplane passed near Taney, provoking return fire from the command ship and batteries ashore which combined to splash the intruder. During this month long period, at least 288 enemy planes attacked the ships in Taney

s vicinity, and at least 96 of these were destroyed.

As if the Japanese menace alone were not enough, in mid-July a typhoon forced the ships at Hagushi to take evasive action. Taney led a convoy eastward on the 19th and returned the next day when the storm passed. She performed the same duties again on the first day of the following month when she led a convoy to sea on typhoon-evasion operations. The ship returned to its anchorage on the 3d.

The end of the war found Taney still off Okinawa. On 16 August, she got underway to support Pennsylvania (BB 38) as three Japanese planes were detected approaching from the northeast. One crashed 30 miles to the north, and two splashed into the sea shortly thereafter. On 25 August, TG 95.5 was dissolved, and Rear Admiral Cobb, who had been embarked during the Okinawa campaign, hauled down his flag and departed.

Taney soon proceeded to Japan, where she took part in the occupation of Wakayama, anchoring off the port city on 11 September and sending a working party ashore the next day. While anchored there, Taney weathered a typhoon which swirled by on the 17th. She was, in fact, one of the few ships which stayed at her berth during the storm, her ground tackle holding well in the sticky clay bottom.

Departing Wakayama on 14 October, Taney returned to the west coast of the United States, via Midway and arrived at San Francisco on 29 October. Moving on for the east coast, Taney transited the Panama Canal and later arrived at her ultimate destination, Charleston, S.C., on 29 November. During the ensuing period of conversion, the Coast Guard vessel was reconfigured as a patrol cutter. She now sported a main battery of a single-mount, 5 inch gun, a hedgehog, a twin 40-millimeter mount, and two 20-millimeter guns in addition to depth charge tracks and projectors.

Upon shifting back to the west coast, Taney was based at Alameda, Calif., into the 1970's. Although she is listed with the ships receiving engagement stars for Korean service, she has no awards listed, indicating her presence only in a support role outside the geographical vicinity of Korean waters. She served as an ocean station weather ship a fishery patrol vessel

and a search and rescue ship. Having been reclassified back to gunboat-WPG 37—the ship was now reclassified again, this time as a high-endurance cutter, and received the designation of WHEC-37 in June of

In the spring of 1969, Taney participated in Operation "Market Time" off the coast of Vietnam. She served a 10-month tour of duty, providing gunfire support and preventing enemy infiltration along the coastal routes used by the Viet Cong and North Vietnamese forces.

In 1972, Taney was shifted back to the east coast and was assigned duty on the last sea-going weather station: "Hotel" off the coasts of Maryland and Virginia. Fitted with a special storm-tracking antenna housed in a distinctive bulbous dome fitted atop her pilot house, Taney deployed seven times yearly, conducting 21 deployments 200 miles off the coast. This last ocean station had been established to track storms threatening the middle states on the east coast which had often struck without warning. Eventually, the use of more sophisticated storm-tracking satellites and radars rendered this station obsolete. Hence, Ocean Station 'Hotel" was closed down in 1977.

Now based out of Norfolk, Va., Taney stands ready to conduct search and rescue missions at sea to protect American fisheries and to enforce the 200-mile limit. She served into 1979 in keeping with the Coast Guard's motto: "Always Ready" Semper Paratus


USS Schley (DD-103) after refit, 1943 - History

About the 1250 Scale Producers' Gallery

This photo gallery features mostly unmodified models from a variety of 1250 scale model producers. For scratch-builds and significantly modified models, see the Reader Gallery. For more information about producers of 1250 scale models, see the 1250 Scale Modeling History and General Information section elsewhere on this site.

Photography Notes: This photo gallery features models from a variety of 1:1200 and 1:1250 scale producers. Some of the models may have been enhanced with additional paint work or details by the collector or owner of the model, but for the most part they are not substantially altered from their factory condition. Because there are so many models in these scales, the gallery concentrates on models that are not easily seen elsewhere. We may include photos of models found elsewhere on the web, but our present goal is to fill in gaps, rather than simply repeat what is already available to you. Extensive photo coverage of NAVIS/NEPTUN and ARGOS models are readily found at their respective websites and we recommend that the viewer go to the direct links to their sites, which are found on the 1250 SCALE Main Page, and view those models there.

St. Cergue, Swiss Freighter 1940, #2 - A special release by Galerie Maritim of an unusual subject, a Swiss freighter. (S-6)

HMS Malta, Heavy Carrier Design 1945, Mountford 1:1250 Scale - Both the USN and RN came a melding of design philosophies for large carrier designs late in the war. For the USN it was the large armored Midway class, whose first unit arrived shortly after the war had ended. For the RN the result was the Malta class whose units never did arrive. Mountford produces a 1:1250 scale resin and white metal of HMS Malta.
HMS Ajax 1942, Leander Class Light Cruiser, Mountford 1:1250 Scale (MM112K) - Mountford produces a resin and white metal model of HMS Ajax as she appeared in 1942.
USS Oriskany 1960, Attack Aircraft Carrier, Mountford 1:1250 Scale (MM250K) - Mountford Models has two versions of USS Oriskany in 1:1250 scale. One is the fully assembled and painted resin model consistent with traditional standard 1:1250 scale practice but the other version is in kit form at a lower price.


USS Schley (DD-103) after refit, 1943 - History

Not long ago I read a book titled Descent into Darkness by Comdr Edward C. Raymer, a 30-year veteran of the US Navy.

Maybe some of you have read his book.

As an enlisted diver, Raymer performed salvage operations at Pearl Harbor.
He and his dive team dove on the USS Arizona, USS West Virginia, USS Nevada, and USS California.

His story, though in many ways tragic and heart-breaking, is interesting in that he states that a number of M1911 pistols were brought up from the USS Arizona. The pistols had been submerged for about eight weeks and the small parts were ruined, but they were rebuilt from the frames up and were made serviceable.

One of those 45s was later traced by the FBI to the USS Arizona.

All U.S. ships with a U.S. Marine contingent on board had an arms room. Not all of the compartments on those ships were flooded or destroyed.

There must exist, perhaps in Naval archives, manifests listing the types and serial numbers of the weapons on each ship.

How would you like to own a M1911, a 1903 rifle, or maybe even a Garand that was on one of those ships?

What if you already own one and don't know it? :)

A couple of years ago when Springfield Research Service was still free I found a 1903 on a auction site that was claimed to have came off the California.I searched SRS and sure enough it was documented as salvaged and rebuilt.

Bottom line is any rebuilt 1903 or 1903 A1 with a 1942 replacement barrel could be from one of those ships sank on December 7,1941.

And I would treasure being lucky enough to own one.

Quite honestly if I were to discover that I owned (say) a .45 Government that was salvaged from the USS Arizona I'd contact the Arizona memorial and find out how it could be returned to the wreck..That is where it really belongs.

When I posted the SN from a 1903 I bought I was told it came from the USS California. The poster who told me about it had the rack #, and the location from within the ship it came from. I was also told that the 1903's that were on the California had "CAL" etched into the top of the receiver. Mine does not so I wonder how accurate the posters info was.

However I did see a 1903 at the NS that did have "CAL" etched into the top of the receiver the day I bought my 1903. I almost bought that rifle just because of the ethed "CAL". I was back at the NS the very next day the store was open. The rifle was gone.

Moral to the story, there are a few identifying marks on the small arms fromthese ships, and they ARE out there.

When I posted the SN from a 1903 I bought I was told it came from the USS California. The poster who told me about it had the rack #, and the location from within the ship it came from. I was also told that the 1903's that were on the California had "CAL" etched into the top of the receiver. Mine does not so I wonder how accurate the posters info was.

However I did see a 1903 at the NS that did have "CAL" etched into the top of the receiver the day I bought my 1903. I almost bought that rifle just because of the ethed "CAL". I was back at the NS the very next day the store was open. The rifle was gone.

Moral to the story, there are a few identifying marks on the small arms fromthese ships, and they ARE out there.

Someone in my local arms collector club has a M1903 from the USS California. He has a copy of the manifest listing all of the small arms assigned to the California and his rifle is listed. I didn't notice if it has a CAL marking on it.

Someone in my local arms collector club has a M1903 from the USS California. He has a copy of the manifest listing all of the small arms assigned to the California and his rifle is listed. I didn't notice if it has a CAL marking on it.

If at all possible I'd like to see the list. Perhaps scan and post? I, and I am sure others, would very much appreciate it.

If at all possible I'd like to see the list. Perhaps scan and post? I, and I am sure others, would very much appreciate it.

The club meets once a month. I'll ask him the next time I see him.

Rifles can become pitted like that in many ways other than submersion.

Improper or damaged storage conditions for instance, or battlefield pick-ups.

Rifles separated from soldiers during the thick of battle and buried in snowbanks or mud would likely remain undiscovered until the end of combat and when fair weather exposed them.

Seems that some ships did have Garands, the thread from the first picture states 1942.

The Yorktown thread dose not give a date, and someone states they may have been added later.

Thanks to all the original posters of the pictures.

I could find no evidence that the Navy received any M1's for ship outfit until after the end of WW II. The M1's you see in ship photos during the war are Marine Corps rifles, not Navy. The Marine Detachment comes aboard with their own rifles, and they are stowed and accounted for separately from the organic small arms. Navy ships that were built during the war received recycled M1903's, new production Remington M1903's and 03A3's, and only enough to outfit the size of the Landing Party that was authorized for the ship type. For a DD, that would be about 12 rifles and one or two BAR's.

The Navy Museum in the Washington Navy yard has several salvaged 03's in the vault. They are in "relic" condition and not on public display. I have personally handled two of the rifles and a Lewis machine gun from ARIZONA. Both 03's were low numbered rifles. That was in 1992, so I don't remember much detail other than that. I was actually at the museum to inspect and select old marksmanship awards for restoration.

Up until recently it was little known that the Navy had done such extensive salvage efforts at Pearl. This was an organized salvage effort, not a few guys diving down to see what they could find. Just a few years ago, or perhaps 8 or 9, it was discovered that some of the guns off of the Arizona had also been salvaged. Not sure why it took so long considering that the navy had records of it anyway. You can look back through National Geographic to read the great articles.

Ironically, even though the ships were outdated by WWII standards, they were raised and used as bombardment ships all the way until the end of the war. So they returned the favor to Japan as they shelled the shorelines prior to invasions in the Pacific.

There is a great photo essay regarding the salvage effort, as well as some of the formerly classified pictures of the damage to the ships on the navy site.

If you dig around enough on the navy's site, they even have documents publicly available that appear to detail most battle damage to major ships in WWII.

Well the Navy literally bailed out the Army's M1 program in the 30's with money from the Navy budget. I'm thinking they probably would have gotten some token M1's for that. Of course that could have been Navy money for outfitting the Marines.

Just thinking out loud here.

There was nothing slapdash about the salvage efforts on the sunken or damaged ships at Pearl Harbor. It is an interesting subject and speaks highly of the effort put forth by the Navy. Only three ships, Arizona, Oklahoma and Utah were not returned to service. It was hazardous duty, several men being killed.

If you are interested in finding out more, read the following two books:

1) Resurrection: Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor by Daniel Madsen. A modern look with much new material.

2) Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal by Vice Admiral (ret.)Homer Wallin. Wallin commanded much of the salvage effort at the height of activity. Wallin has a small section on "Salvage of Ordnance Material", which includes small arms. No real detail is given, however.

3) Descent into Darkness by Cdr. (ret.) Edward Raymer, which I believe was already mentioned.

I've always regretted that USS Arizona was denied the opportunity to bring her big 14-inch rifles to bear against the enemy during the war, because for the entire war she lay in ruins at Pearl Harbor.


However I have now learned that the 14-inch guns from the #2 turret of the USS Arizona were salvaged and later installed aboard the battleship USS Nevada (BB-36) in the fall of 1944. Nevada then used those guns against the Japanese during the invasions Okinawa and Iwo Jima.

I like to think that Nevada's crew had some unseen gunners helping them at Okinawa and Iwo.

Up until recently it was little known that the Navy had done such extensive salvage efforts at Pearl. This was an organized salvage effort, not a few guys diving down to see what they could find. Just a few years ago, or perhaps 8 or 9, it was discovered that some of the guns off of the Arizona had also been salvaged. Not sure why it took so long considering that the navy had records of it anyway. You can look back through National Geographic to read the great articles.

Ironically, even though the ships were outdated by WWII standards, they were raised and used as bombardment ships all the way until the end of the war. So they returned the favor to Japan as they shelled the shorelines prior to invasions in the Pacific.

If you are interested in this subject, and if you ever visit Pearl Harbour, you should go to the Arizona memorial bookstore and get a copy of the book "resurrection" (I think that is the name). It is a detailed account of the salvage operations of all the ships at Pearl.

Those old BBs did more than just bombard beaches. They drubbed the last of the IJN in the Suragio Strait during the Leyte landings.

There was nothing slapdash about the salvage efforts on the sunken or damaged ships at Pearl Harbor. It is an interesting subject and speaks highly of the effort put forth by the Navy. Only three ships, Arizona, Oklahoma and Utah were not returned to service. It was hazardous duty, several men being killed.

If you are interested in finding out more, read the following two books:

1) Resurrection: Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor by Daniel Madsen. A modern look with much new material.

2) Pearl Harbor: Why, How, Fleet Salvage and Final Appraisal by Vice Admiral (ret.)Homer Wallin. Wallin commanded much of the salvage effort at the height of activity. Wallin has a small section on "Salvage of Ordnance Material", which includes small arms. No real detail is given, however.

3) Descent into Darkness by Cdr. (ret.) Edward Raymer, which I believe was already mentioned.

Actually Oaklahoma could have been rebuilt like the other BB, but by the time they got it righted and into drydock (mid 1943) it was judged a waste of time money and other resources. They took the guns and everything else off and sold the hull for scrap, but the ship broke its tow line in heavy seas on the way back to the west coast and it sank. Incredibly, the DDs Shaw Cassin & Downes were all rebuilt. If you saw these three ships, you would not believe it. The Shaw exploding is one of the more dramatic photos taken.

So, only 1 BB and 1 target ship were total losses, the Arizona and Utah.

If at all possible I'd like to see the list. Perhaps scan and post? I, and I am sure others, would very much appreciate it.

I went to the local collectors' association meeting for the first time in months today and saw that guy and asked about getting a copy of the manifest. He didn't have the documentation with him and he wasn't very forthcoming, he said someone who owns a USS California rifle should pay to have the Springfield Research Service provide information, that's where he got what he has. He said his listing was just for one battery or locker that his rifle was stored in, not the whole ship.

Seems that some ships did have Garands, the thread from the first picture states 1942.

The Yorktown thread dose not give a date, and someone states they may have been added later.

Thanks to all the original posters of the pictures.

Them pics look like my vacation trip to the Yorktown.

I went to the local collectors' association meeting for the first time in months today and saw that guy and asked about getting a copy of the manifest. He didn't have the documentation with him and he wasn't very forthcoming, he said someone who owns a USS California rifle should pay to have the Springfield Research Service provide information, that's where he got what he has. He said his listing was just for one battery or locker that his rifle was stored in, not the whole ship.

Well I guess it wil all be lost to history then.

Here is a link to my photobucket album with pictures of the salvaged M1903 that can be found in the Pacific Aviation Museum on Ford Island. It was from USS California. http://s21.photobucket.com/albums/b269/mulestang/Pacific%20Aviation%20Museum%20Jan%202010/

Looks in good shape, must have been salvaged soon after.

Bear in mind, some of the battleships at Pearl weren't "sunk". If I recall, California was beached, and I doubt if her small arms even got wet.

Damaged and stranded, yes. sunk, not really.

No firearm, but my Dad worked in the motor pool at Pearl Harbor and he had several items that were recovered from the sunken ships. I guess he traded for them.
And Decent into Darkness is an interesting book. I bought it several years ago. Gets spooky when he talks about the tapping on his diving helmet while working in the dark. Must have been quite an experience.

When did your dad work at the motor pool? I was there in '58 and '59.

Some additional information on WW II salvage. The Salvage officer for Pearl was on his way to a salvage assignment in the Red Sea and happened to be in Pearl when the attack happened. The assignment in the Red Sea was later given to Cmdr. Edward Ellsberg and he wrote a book about that assignment, "Under The Red Sea Sun". He also wrote of salvage work in North Africa, "No Banners, No Bugles", and the Normandy invasion, "The Far Shore". I have recently reread all of them and some of his other books my parents new Cmdr. Ellsberg.

Here is a web site about him his grandson hosts:
http://www.edwardellsberg.com/

Some additional information on WW II salvage. The Salvage officer for Pearl was on his way to a salvage assignment in the Red Sea and happened to be in Pearl when the attack happened. The assignment in the Red Sea was later given to Cmdr. Edward Ellsberg and he wrote a book about that assignment, "Under The Red Sea Sun". He also wrote of salvage work in North Africa, "No Banners, No Bugles", and the Normandy invasion, "The Far Shore". I have recently reread all of them and some of his other books my parents new Cmdr. Ellsberg.

Here is a web site about him his grandson hosts:
http://www.edwardellsberg.com/

Springfield Research got the list from the national archives. Its all still out there if you have the time to find it. I wish I would have written down everything on SRS back when it was public, but I never thought they'd privatize it like they did. If I recall, they guy who started SRS believed that a tidbit could be found on almost every rifle if you had time to go through all the data.

I read once that 2/3 of the national archives holdings were generated during WWII.

I plan on retireing in about 50 years. When that time comes, those archives won't know what hit them.

Just in case anyone cares, I think I read that most of the records in question reside in Maryland.

I could find no evidence that the Navy received any M1's for ship outfit until after the end of WW II. The M1's you see in ship photos during the war are Marine Corps rifles, not Navy. The Marine Detachment comes aboard with their own rifles, and they are stowed and accounted for separately from the organic small arms. Navy ships that were built during the war received recycled M1903's, new production Remington M1903's and 03A3's, and only enough to outfit the size of the Landing Party that was authorized for the ship type. For a DD, that would be about 12 rifles and one or two BAR's.

The Navy Museum in the Washington Navy yard has several salvaged 03's in the vault. They are in "relic" condition and not on public display. I have personally handled two of the rifles and a Lewis machine gun from ARIZONA. Both 03's were low numbered rifles. That was in 1992, so I don't remember much detail other than that. I was actually at the museum to inspect and select old marksmanship awards for restoration.

Bob, the pictures I saw in the battleship Washington did have the Marines holding the M1s. It still surprised me to see M1s in service with the Marines on shipboard duty this early in the war.

Don't think we are refering to salvaging the weapons now the topic is when the ships were raised for repair. At that time, rifles(and Naval warships) were in short supply.

It would be like raiding a tomb to "salvage" these guns. Who could look at the sunken ship and only see the "tragedy" of ruined firearms? They're just guns.

Not long ago I read a book titled Descent into Darkness by Comdr Edward C. Raymer, a 30-year veteran of the US Navy.

Maybe some of you have read his book.

As an enlisted diver, Raymer performed salvage operations at Pearl Harbor.
He and his dive team dove on the USS Arizona, USS West Virginia, USS Nevada, and USS California.

His story, though in many ways tragic and heart-breaking, is interesting in that he states that a number of M1911 pistols were brought up from the USS Arizona. The pistols had been submerged for about eight weeks and the small parts were ruined, but they were rebuilt from the frames up and were made serviceable.

One of those 45s was later traced by the FBI to the USS Arizona.

All U.S. ships with a U.S. Marine contingent on board had an arms room. Not all of the compartments on those ships were flooded or destroyed.

There must exist, perhaps in Naval archives, manifests listing the types and serial numbers of the weapons on each ship.

How would you like to own a M1911, a 1903 rifle, or maybe even a Garand that was on one of those ships?

What if you already own one and don't know it? :)

I have a pistol salvaged from the USS Shaw, which was damaged at Pearl Harbor and was the first warship repaired after the attack.

Knew a gentleman in Colorado who, as a kid, was at Pearl Harbor during the attack and afterward. He and his friends would play around the salvage from the ships and he picked up a couple of 03's from the California and took them home. He donated one to the Admiral Nimitz Museum in Fredericksburg, Texas.

The Museum also has a documented combat M1 with a great story behind it.

I have a pistol salvaged from the USS Shaw, which was damaged at Pearl Harbor and was the first warship repaired after the attack.


How did you find out this pistol is from the USS Shaw ??

How did you find out this pistol is from the USS Shaw ??

I purchased it from a friend of the Sailor who salvaged and repaired it. The Sailor, a Pearl Harbor veteran, returned to Missouri after the war and made a living as a farmer. He considered the pistol contraband sold it to an acquaintance, a fellow farmer who was an Army reserve officer at the time, in the early 1980s.

The Sailor was retiring from farming and held an auction to liquidate his equipment and possessions he no longer wanted. The purchaser bought the pistol, for a modest price, less that $100 and afterward the sailor told him the story how he salvaged it from the USS Shaw, and had the small parts and grips replaced by a Navy armorer. He was also happy that another military man would now own the pistol, and asked to preserve its history.

The pistol was never sold or advertised with the story or as a Pearl harbor relic. The purchaser, my friend, wrote down the story and kept the pistol since. He showed me the pistol and told me the story.
I was initially very skeptical of the story.

So I started researching the pistol and its story. Another individual provided information on a pistol very close in serial number, documented to have come from the USS Shaw and found in the bottom of the YF-1 drydock, on display at the museum at the USS Arizona Memorial. Both pistols are Colt Transition Model 1911s in the 708,000 number range and are only 16 numbers apart.

We also completely disassembled the pistol and used several references to examine it and to determine which parts were replaced and if those parts were pre 1942. All the replaced parts were pre 1942 manufacture. This type of repair is detailed on page 99 of "Decent into Darkness" by Edward C. Raymer, a book detailing a lot of the salvage efforts at Pearl Harbor.
We next looked at the apparent blast and water damage. Also, there is damage to the front end of the slide which may have come from a fall onto a hard surface.

So putting all this together has in my mind verified the story with this pistol. The Navy did stop the practice of allowing the sailors to keep the pistols found during the salvage operations. Raymer stated the arms lockers/rooms were priority targets for looting and the 45 service pistol was the most sought after souvenir during the salvage operations.

In my mind there may be a lot of others out there its a question of knowing what to look for, what may be dismissed as a poor condition 1911 may in fact be a veteran of an improtant battle in American history. My hope is that my research may in some way help others uncover similar pistols.